Reg's Blog

Senior and Post-Acute Healthcare News and Topics

CMS Proposes Additional Bundled Payments: The Post-Acute Implications

On July 25, CMS released a proposed rule to create additional bundled payments/DRG focused EPMs, targeted for July 1, 2017.  The announcement/proposed rule is consistent with CMS’ and the Administration’s goal to migrate up to 50% of all traditional FFS (fee-for-service) payments to alternative models by 2018.  As with the CJR (bundled payments for hip and knee replacements), the comment period is relatively short.  Similarly, the likelihood of CMS deviating much in terms of timelines and methodology (payment) from the proposed rule is slim.  The view is that CMS has foretold providers of these initiatives, created a pathway or road map via analogous alternative models (BPIC and ACOs), and developed a systematic approach to the operational elements of the initiatives sufficient for providers to adapt and move forward.

Bundled Payments for Coordinated Cardiac and Hip-Fracture Care

As in the CJR initiative/rule, CMS has identified certain DRGs that it believes via evidence and study,  present opportunities for cost reduction and improved quality outcomes emanating from initial hospitalization through an episode of care equaling 90 days.  Following a near identical road map or path used with CJR (hip and knee replacement), CMS will provide the originating hospital with a target payment goal based on a regionally weighted average  with a small, statistically smoothed reduction.  This targeted value is the cost benchmark for the applicable DRG plus all related costs for a period totaling 90 days, encompassing the hospital originating stay.  Functionally, the payment equals the hospital inpatient stay, post-acute services, outpatient services, certain physician and supply components, etc. (aka the Episode Payment or “bundled payment”).  Below is a summary of the DRGs that make up the new “bundles” and the methodology in terms of how this initiative is set to work.

  • Includes cardiac care elements/DRGs for myocardial infarction and coronary artery bypass graft procedures (MI and CABG) plus an orthopedic element for hip/femur fractures and surgeries that is an addition or augment to the CJR.  The cardiac elements are mandated for hospitals in 98 MSAs (anyone who wants the list or wants to know about a particular region, contact me as provided on this site).  The hip/femur element is only applicable in the CJR regions; the original 67.
  • The related DRGs are:
    • Myocardial Infarction (MI): DRGs 280-282
    • Coronary Artery Bypass (CABG): DRGs 231-236
    • Surgical Hip Femur Fracture Treatment (SHFFT): DRGs 480-482
  • The Hospital is paid a calculated amount based on a regional target by applicable DRG
  • The amount is equal to the cost of the care at the hospital and the target, reflects the total expected cost for the complete episode of care (hospital, physician, post-acute).  The actual payment to the hospital is the target amount minus a quality measures discount equal to 1.5 to 3%.  Based on actual performance, savings can be returned as an incentive or recouped.
  • Post-acute providers bill per fee schedule.
  • In year 1, CMS reviews the costs per episode, the applicable quality indicators and patient satisfaction results. The review is against expected costs and quality standards.
  • In year 2, CMS reviews the same data and if the costs and quality are equal to or better than expected, the hospital can receive an incentive payment. If worse, the hospital will see a payment reduction (capped at 5% in year 2, moves to 10% in year 3 and 20% in following years).
  • Hospitals after year 1, can contract with post-acute providers to share risk (gains and losses) if the post-acute providers meet certain quality standards (3 star or better).
  • The whole initiative is slated for a 5 year period after which, CMS will review.

(The above is a cliff-note version covering the major highlights.  I have a client-based, in-depth summary that I can provide to readers.  Contact me via email at hislop3@msn.com or via a comment to this post.  Please provide a current, working email address and I will forward the summary, free of charge)

Within the proposed rule, CMS introduced two additional initiatives;

  • Cardiac Rehab Incentive Payments: A series of incentive payments to get hospitals under the Cardiac initiative to aggressively push patients into cardiac rehab programs during the 90 day Episode. These payments would be made to participants in 45 regions not selected and 45 additional regions selected within the bundled payment program.
    • First 11 cardiac rehab services will include a $25 per service bonus.
    • Services after 11 will include an incentive payment of $175 per service, up through the 90 day episode window.
    • Sessions are limited to 36 one hour periods over 36 weeks with a possible extension of an additional 36 sessions over a longer period if authorized by the MAC (Medicare Administrative Contractor). Intensive sessions are limited to 72 one hour sessions, up to 6 sessions per day, for 18 weeks.
  • A pathway for physicians that participate in bundled payments to qualify for financial rewards under the Quality Payment Program (CHIP and MACRA). Essentially, the methodology creates incentives for physicians that choose to be at a certain level of financial risk for payment loss, to gain incentive payments for meeting certain quality standards and adopting Electronic Health Record Technology.

Post-Acute Implications and Strategies

Unlike CJR, the implications for post-acute providers under the cardiac components are fairly minimal. The typical down-stream referrals (post-acute hospitalization services) for the cardiac components in the rule are minimal.  Most cardiac patients utilize after-care services through the hospital directly; principally for cardiac rehab.  When post-hospitalization discharges include care services, the bulk are through and coordinated with home health.  If more intense periods of inpatient care are required after acute hospitalization, the typical path is discharge to LTAcH or IRF.  This component however, can provide some strategic opportunities for SNFs that want to embrace a cardiac program with proper staffing, technology investments (telemetry), etc.

The SHHFT (hip/femur fracture) initiative is similar in opportunity to the CJR.  It presents SNFs and HHAs with numerous opportunities to partner with orthopedic groups, hospitals, and surgery centers to develop lower cost, high quality, coordinated care programs.  As with CJR, this phase of the bundled payment programs includes regulatory waivers for high quality providers (start ratings 3 and above).  These waivers include the three-day qualifying hospital stay for SNF coverage and the relaxation (requirements) of direct referral relationships that include incentive dollars.

For certain post-acute providers, there may be some opportunity to advance into the cardiac rehab arena.  While the incentive payments are targeted to the hospital, the hospital can pass these along and many may want do to just that.  Hospital cost structures are often too high to reap a modest incentive reward such as provided in the rule, necessitating a partner-type relationship to deliver the actual programming.

Strategically, post-acute providers need to consider the following and position accordingly;

  • As with CJR, star ratings matter.  SNFs and HHAs that want to succeed, garner partner opportunities and referrals should rate/rank 4 or 5 stars.  While three stars can play, the same will be market constricted by the 4 and 5 star programs.
  • Quality matters.  Post-acute providers need to aggressively monitor their outcomes and their patient satisfaction.  I recommend the following at a minimum.
    • QA and reduce as much as possible, any rehospitalization.  To do this, staff need training, tools such as INTERACT, service depth expanded and reviewed, and proper support tools and equipment available.
    • Employ or develop a Care Navigator within your organization (more than one if need be).  I recommend that this position is tasked with handling all critical elements of the initial referral and intake, coordinating all care during the post-acute stay, coordinating discharge including referrals downstream (e.g., SNF to home care), coordinating return physician visits, patient teaching, and all follow-ups on status and questions.  This role should include watching lengths of stay and gathering critical quality measures such as weight loss, wound/skin, falls, infections, etc.
    • Develop and utilize pathways and protocols that correlate to the bundled payment DRGs for the post-acute components.  In other words, if your organization is a SNF, it should have a post-surgical pathway for a femur fracture that covers from admission, pain management, therapies, skin and wound, length of stay, patient teaching, discharge, etc. all laid out in a pathway/decision matrix married to care plans.  Not only are these necessary to assure effective, efficient care; they are great marketing tools.  Collaborate with the hospital, with physician partners and discharge partners to gain a complete perspective.
    • Train and develop staff skills to coincide with the types of patients encompassed by the bundled payment models.  Your SNF or HHA should have expertise in every care element plus ideally, staff that have advanced training and certifications in key disciplines.  For example, an SNF that seeks to take post CABG patients needs RNs with ALS certification and telemetry experience/training.
    • Develop a post-acute continuum.  Playing in the bundled payment arena now and going forward as a post-acute provider will necessitate having a continuum of services.  Bundled payments and being at risk are anathema to truncated, one-off providers.  In other words, an SNF that doesn’t have a HHA component and outpatient component won’t be a referral magnet as the EPMs (episodic payment models) move forward.  I recommend providers that can, acquire or develop their own programs and those that cannot, partner accordingly.  Quality and efficiency are key so if for example an SNF chooses to partner with a HHA, the SNF is warned to find such an agency that will match quality, monitor all elements of outcome data and satisfaction, collaborate on program development, QA, etc.  The same is true for outpatient relationships.

As with CJR, the focus in this next phase is to re-shape how the post-acute provider world interacts with the acute hospital and physician world.  Providers need to re-organize thematically on quality, efficiency and collaboration. The winners (if you will) are the providers that manage the most services, in a coordinate delivery model, that can demonstrate quality with the ability to manage and coordinate care across a myriad of delivery points; seamlessly.

 

August 5, 2016 Posted by | Home Health, Policy and Politics - Federal, Skilled Nursing | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment