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Senior and Post-Acute Healthcare News and Topics

Know Your Market, Know Your Value Proposition

Last October I wrote a post regarding the development of an Economic Value Analysis and how the same is important for marketing seniors housing and skilled nursing.  A couple of weeks ago, I wrote a post regarding feasibility tests key to project success and targeted feasibility.  Later this year, in October at Leading Age’s annual conference in Denver, I’ll again cover the concepts in a direct, interactive fashion.  Until such time however, I continue to receive dozens upon dozens of inquiries as to how to construct an Economic Value Analysis and a corresponding value proposition.  Last October’s post is instructive and can be found at http://wp.me/ptUlY-7G.  In addition, and in concert with the post prior to this one on financial feasibility methodologies, I’ve provided below some additional “help points”.

Economic Value Analysis is a fairly simple process that centers on determining the ability or capability of a product or service to satisfy the core demands of a given market; the ability to quantify utility.  Utility in this context, simply stated, is satisfaction at a given price.  For seniors housing, the struggle always is “how” to demonstrate value to potential consumers in a way that is logical and meaningful.  This is acutely problematic in a market that is competitive as the “noise” emanating from all the competitors regarding price and services is constant and at times, deafening.  At its core, Economic Value Analysis creates a more tangible constant.

Given that seniors housing has a very elastic demand curve (a great many substitute products provide equal or proximally equal core utility), the devil is creating a comparison basis and this basis is not “stated price or features”.  A place to start is completing a simple analysis that equates a seniors housing unit per square foot cost (cost = fixed costs, variable costs, and margin) to the comparable alternatives in the market.  In this case, comparable alternatives equal rental housing, other competitors, community dwellings (housing units, condominiums, etc).  Ignore your current pricing structure as unless the same is equalized on a square foot basis, this analysis won’t provide a true picture.

Taking the example to the next level, once the cost per square foot is known, determine the relevent market comparables.  This does take some homework but it is fairly easy to complete.  Via simple survey, one can generally gather enough information from realtors, friends, etc. to determine a community housing cost per square foot (utilities, taxes, rent costs, depreciation/maintenance, etc.).  Gaining information from competitors is even easier as typically, they publish the information or a simple “blind shopping” trip gathers all the necessary information.

Once the information is gathered, populate a simple spreadsheet with the data.  If the core cost per square foot for the seniors housing option is higher, and it typically is, the analysis must delve deeper.  Usually, elements that drive costs for seniors housing come in the form of rate or price inclusions such as meals, cable television, maid/cleaning services, etc.  Two approaches to deal with this issue are possible.  First, back these costs out of the seniors housing number and re-analyze the comparables.  Second, and my recommended method, gather data on these services and develop a square foot comparable.  Between competitors, the key is to keep the data as apples to apples as possible so one must be clear that the costs include exactly (or as close as possible) the same features/amenities, etc.

Once all the information is known and “spread” and sorted, the picture should become clear.  I like to look closest and hardest at the comparison between living at a seniors housing complex versus living in a market rate situation whether that is home, condominium or rental.  The age-old belief among seniors is that a seniors housing community is too expensive.  The analysis should detail where the true costs lie.  Expect some price sensitivity issues where the seniors housing is a tad more expensive but the difference should be clearly and easily explained (24 hour services, access to care, transportation, etc.).  The more than can be quantified in the form of dollars, the tighter the analysis becomes and the easier it is to explain where the salient benefits lies.  If the gap between the seniors housing cost and the alternatives is too high, the issue may lie in the structural elements of the equation such as inordinately high fixed costs or variable costs.  Becoming competitive may require changing, if possible, the financial drivers of the seniors housing project equation.

Concluding, the square foot model works exceptionally well in this analysis as it provides flexibility to model and to change any number of variables.  It also is “non-unit” specific so its data and results aren’t skewed by less-than relevant unit pricing schemes.  The difficulty simply lies in taking the time to build the model and to accurately gather solid data from the “universe” of housing alternatives.  Assuming costs mirror most of the market, the value proposition thus becomes a powerful tool that can and should be used in market positioning.

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April 3, 2012 - Posted by | Assisted Living, Senior Housing | , , , , , , , ,

1 Comment »

  1. […] Continue Reading: Know Your Market, Know Your Value Proposition […]

    Pingback by Know Your Market, Know Your Value Proposition | April 3, 2012 | Reply


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