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Analysis: Kindred Pursuit of Gentiva

In news just released, Kindred (the post-acute, skilled, rehab and LTAcH behemoth) has made two separate offers to purchase control of Gentiva, the latest a $14 per share offer consisting of half cash, half stock ($7 and $7). An earlier offer of $13 per share was rejected and it appears the $14 offer will see the same fate. Prior to the news, Gentiva stock was trading in the mid $6 range, down 20% over the preceding 12 months.  The value of the “deal” is pegged at $1.6 billion with $533 million of the total in cash and stock, the balance in assumed Gentiva debt.  On a combined basis, Kindred/Gentiva would weigh-in at $7.2 billion in annual revenues, operating in 47 states.

To date, Gentiva has held fast that it is not for sale and that its present plan, implemented as One Gentiva will create more shareholder value over-time than the Kindred offer.  In December, I wrote a similar analysis post on Gentiva/Harden (the merger) and the home health industry.  The post can be found at http://wp.me/ptUlY-fV . In this post, I commented on the clear flaws in the One Gentiva strategy; principally the broadening of reimbursement risk strategy that is at the core of this strategy.  While Gentiva posted a modest recent quarter profit after $180 million loss, virtually all of the reported gain was a result of accretion from the Harden transaction, not improved operations.  For example, adjusted income attributable to Gentiva shareholders for the first quarter 2014 was $4,8 million compared to $7.1 million twelve months prior.  Net cash provided by operating activities for the first quarter was negative $17.7 million vs. negative $20.6 million one-year prior – not a resounding improvement.  Essentially, the fundamentals of the company are not improving and in some cases, set to erode going forward as the lion share of its revenues are Medicare home health and Medicare hospice (Odyssey) driven (88.5%).  Both Medicare programs face down reimbursement trend pressure, home health dramatically more so than hospice.  Hospice however, is under enormous industry-wide pressure due to continued fraud investigations among major players and the loom of federal program reform (the Medicare hospice benefit).  Essentially, hospice is a no-growth industry now.

Reviewing multiple factors and general industry trends plus the health policy and economic outlooks for both companies and the post-acute industry globally, below is my analysis of the factors influencing (or should influence) the Kindred and Gentiva position.

Kindred: Where Gentiva has a reimbursement risk concentration problem, Kindred has a location of care or outlet concentration problem.  Kindred is brick and mortar deep/heavy, actually too heavy.  Institutional outlets, especially in-scale and capacity are shrinking.  The revenue needs required to support institutional care, on a post-acute basis, are increasing while reimbursement is flat to falling.  The LTAcH and SNF trends are flat and the operational efficiencies available to any provider are minimal, save offloading or minimizing debt. The quality expectations evidenced in regulation and pay-for-performance models won’t allow any significant reductions in variable costs today.  To be an institutional player of success, one must have broad clinical capacity, right-sized bed compliments that match payer demand (occupied by the highest payers at high occupancy levels) and non-institutional outlets to capture discharge revenues plus participate in global contract arenas and networks (ACOs, etc.).  Kindred lacks the home health/hospice scale, especially on a matching outlet basis in its respective markets.  Gentiva adds this element, though at a bit of a risk via the amount of debt that Kindred would assume.  The acquisition is not without risk or a sure-winner.  True Gentiva brings the home health/hospice/community care component that Kindred needs as well as the scale to be immediately impactful, it simultaneously adds another level of reimbursement risk and industry risk that Kindred already has on a large-scale.  Managing and integrating the Gentiva elements into Kindred’s longer range provider of choice model will not come easy.  Likewise, the Gentiva acquisition will only mask temporarily, the fact that Kindred needs to right-size its own portfolio post its acquisitions of Rehabcare and Integracare (the latter a Texas limited home health/hospice provider) while still holding and operating, too much inpatient real estate that isn’t optimally performing in many markets.  In essence, the play makes sense but not fully positive until all the pieces are brought tightly together; a difficult and time-consuming endeavor.

Gentiva: Gentiva has the same problems that Amedysis has and had – it needs to shrink but it can’t.  Gentiva has too much debt and in a reimbursement environment that trends flat to down, it cannot grow itself out of its debt problem by “more of the same”.  It’s diversification strategy through the Harden acquisition is too little, too late and not scalable fast enough to have meaningful impact.  It similarly, can reduce expenses fast-enough via consolidation as it must chase revenue growth to survive and the revenue growth that pays the most is Medicare – a risk concentration it already has too much of.  It needed to re-tool 8 to 10 years ago, balancing its revenue model and expanding its clinical capabilities beyond the typical home health outlet.  Additionally, it needed to become more local-market centric and not simply a Medicare reimbursement machine like Amedysis (an accident waiting to happen).  The notion that its One Gentiva plan can create more value for Gentiva shareholders that the Kindred offer is wrong-headed.  Sans takeover talk, Gentiva trades between $6 and $8 and no upward trajectory is visible.  A simple return analysis illustrates that a Gentiva shareholder will wait at least 18 months or more to equal a return of $14 today, excluding opportunity costs on the investment.  Similarly, the risk concentration elements that could turn such an outlook even more dire are more than double on the Gentiva holding than on a comparable dollar for dollar holding with Kindred.  Kindred simply has more ways to generate revenue, a more stable expense base, lower fixed costs and less reimbursement risk concentration than Gentiva.  If Gentiva chooses not to sell, holding out for more than $14, I think the shareholders will pressure such a move in the near-term future.  The Kindred offer, with debt assumption is in my opinion,  a max value offer that 12 months from now, is off the table.

 

 

 

 

 

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May 15, 2014 Posted by | Home Health | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment