Reg's Blog

Senior and Post-Acute Healthcare News and Topics

Site Neutral Payment Update

In early October, I wrote an article regarding CMS 2019 OPPS (outpatient PPS) proposed rule, specifically regarding site neutral payments.  The purpose of the article was to address the site neutrality trend that CMS is on, streamlining payments to reduced location of care disparities for the same care services.  Succinctly, if the care provided is technically the same but the costs by location are different due to operating and capital requirements, should payments vary?

Yesterday, CMS pushed forward the OPPS final rule, maintaining the concept of site neutrality despite heavy hospital lobbying.  The gist of the rule is as follows.

  • Hospital off-campus outpatient facilities will now be paid the same as physician-owned or independently owned/operated outpatient facilities for clinic visits.  No longer will there be a hospital place-of-care premium attached to the payment.
  • Off campus is defined as 250 yards or more “away” from the hospital campus or a remote location.
  • For CY 2019, the phase-in/transition is a payment reduction equal to 50% of the net difference between the physician fee schedule payment for a clinic visit and the same payment for a hospital locus clinic or outpatient setting.  The amount is equal to 70% of the OPPS (hospital outpatient PPS rate).
  • For CY 2020, the amount paid will be the physician fee schedule amount or 40% of OPPS rate, regardless of location.
  • Final Rule text is here: 2019 OPPS Final Rule

What CMS noted originally as the need stemmed from a Medpac report where a Level 2 echocardiogram cost 141% more in a hospital outpatient setting than in a physician office/clinic setting. This final rule is part of an expected and continuing trend to simplify and streamline payments among provider locations.  Similarly, CMS is following a path or theme laid forth by Medpac concerning payments tied to care services and patient needs rather than settings or places of care.  The 2019 OPPS payment change is a $760 million savings in 2019 expenditures.

Finalization of the OPPS rule with site neutral payments cannot be overlooked in significance. As I wrote in the October article, this is a harbinger of where CMS and Medicare policy makers are heading.  Hospitals lobbied hard and heavy against this implementation claiming a distinction in payment was not only required by dictated by patient care discrepancies.  Alas, there appeared to be no common ground found within that argument.

I suspect now that the door is opened just a touch wider for site neutral post-acute payment proposals to advance.  Under certain case-mix categories, there truly is very little difference in care delivered and no difference in outcomes (adversely so) between SNFs, IRFs, and LTAcHs yet there is wide payment difference.  With lengths of stay declining and occupancy rates the same (declining) among these provider groups, CMS will no doubt (my opinion) push forward a streamlined proposal on site neutral payments in the next three years.  I anticipate the first proposal to concentrate almost exclusively, on SNFs, IRFs and perhaps, some home health case mix categories.  If hospitals can’t budge CMS away from the site neutral path, there is zero likelihood that IRFs and LTAcHs can divert CMS from site neutral proposals in the near future.

 

Advertisements

November 2, 2018 Posted by | Policy and Politics - Federal, Skilled Nursing | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Don’t Miss Event: Webinar on Reducing Rehospitalizations

A week from today, I am conducting a webinar on reducing/avoiding unnecessary rehospitalizations.  With SNFs just experiencing the VBP impact (Medicare incentive or reduction) starting October 1, this event is extremely timely.  I’ll cover the health policy and reimbursement implications regarding rehospitalizations plus new QRP and QM updates.  I’ll also touch on PDPM implications.  Some great tools are available for attendees as well.

Register here at a super price – $59 for the session and the tools!

http://hcmarketplace.com/reducing-readmissions

 

November 1, 2018 Posted by | Policy and Politics - Federal, Skilled Nursing | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

SNF QRP and What the Data Means

Yesterday, CMS began posting the first elements from the Quality Reporting Program.  There are five elements that contain data, compared to the national average.

  1. Percent of residents developing new or worsening pressure injuries
  2. Percent of residents experiencing one or more falls with major injury
  3. Percent of residents who had a functional assessment on admission and the outcomes incorporated on the careplan and assessed at discharge
  4. Medicare spending per beneficiary
  5. Percent of successful return to home or community

A sixth measure regarding avoidable, 30 day hospital readmission was not reported as CMS is still trying to determine how to best present the data.

The above data is available for each SNF on Nursing Home Compare.  To view, go to the website, choose a facility and then delve into the “Quality of Resident Care” tab.  At the bottom of the screen, expand the sections on short-stay and long-stay to view all Quality Measures including this latest set.

As in most cases, data is only as valuable as it is meaningful and communicates a story.  In this case, I would caution that these new measures still bear a touch of skepticism for current interpretation.

  • The data in most cases, is more than nine months to a year old (observations between 2016 and 2017).
  • The context of some of the measures may be incongruous to others more recently reported.  For example, there is a long-stay QM on falls with a major injury where the data set/accumulation period is 7/1/17 to 6/30/18.  The comparable new QRP data point on falls is illustrative of data between 1/1/17 and 12/31/17.  My point is that no data for any measurement, including the new QRP measures, should be viewed separately without a common review of all QM data current (or at least as current as is available).
  • The famed quote of former British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli (appropriated by Mark Twain and others) harkens: “There are three types of lies; lies, damn lies, and statistics”. There are 15,000 plus SNFs and as I have experienced, clear uniformity in data reporting exists in form as much as spotted Zebras.  And, I am not calling any SNF a liar.  Claims-based measures are a touch more reliable but remember; inaccurate claims and upcoding per CMS OIG is rampant in the industry.  Garbage in, garage out?

So a question I have already been asked dozens of times today: Is this data meaningful, useful and if so, how so?  Being a true Trinitarian: Yes, No and Maybe.  Here’s how I see the QRP impact now.

  • It will have virtually no impact or should I say, absolutely no impact, for consumers.  It is simply too arcane to digest without a better context for consumers.
  • The data is old so now, its reliability on a face-value basis is questionable (kindly stated).  Much changes in the SNF environment, good and bad.  Changes in leadership, ownership, MDS Coordinators can “funk-up” data results quickly.
  • As I indicated, it must be viewed in complete context against all other QMs.
  • Those facilities that are good, consistent performers will exhibit the same outcomes with their QRP results.
  • Facilities that are poor performers will have their poor results magnified or validated via the QRP data.
  • There will be a small set of facilities for which the QRP data is not relevant at all.  They are the facilities that have undergone some sort of cataclysmic change since the data measurement started in 2016, likely in 2017.  This could represent a good or negative trend.

Finally, if there is some use it will be in the form of strategy within narrow networks, ACOs, etc.  The Medicare spend per beneficiary number, if it is below 1, could be of value.  Again, one needs caution as that result is more than one year old.  What I do know from the Managed Care/Med Advantage folks is that this data set will have ZERO implications for them.  As I have written before, these plans are buyers in a universe of sellers.  There are too many beds available, even among good providers, in most markets.  Frankly, SNF supply exceeds demand by a TON.  A Med Advantage plan has no need to pay-up for access nor be horribly concerned that a bed will not be available, even at the best 5 Star providers.  Until supply ratchets down to meet actual demand, it will be a Buyer’s market for Med Advantage plans with no need to negotiate/pay more for access.

October 26, 2018 Posted by | Policy and Politics - Federal, Skilled Nursing | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Post-Acute, Site Neutral Payment Upcoming?

In the 2019 OPPS (outpatient PPS) proposed rule, CMS included a site neutral payment provision.  With the comment period closed, the lobbying (against) fierce, it will be interesting to see where CMS lands in terms of the final OPPS rule – maintain, change, or abate.  The one thing that is for certain, regardless of the fate of this provision, site neutral proposals/provisions are advancing.

CMS has advanced a series of conceptually similar approaches to payment reform.  Site neutral approaches are a twist on value-based care as they seek to reward the efficiency of care by de-emphasizing a setting value.  This is loosely an approach to “payment follows the patient” rather than the payment is dictated by the locus of care.  Assuming, which isn’t always in evidence, that for many if not most outpatient procedures, the care required is the same such that one setting vs. another isn’t impactful to the outcome, then a site neutral payment seems logical.  Managed care companies have been using this approach overtly, attaching higher cost-share to certain sites or eliminating payment altogether for procedures done in higher cost settings. In the OPPS proposal, the savings is rather substantial – $760 million spread between provider payments and patient savings (deductibles).  To most policy watchers, there is a watershed moment possible with this proposal and its fate.  The fundamental question yet resolved is whether hospitals will continue to have a favorable payment nuance over physician practices and free-standing outpatient providers.  Hospitals arguing that their administrative burden and infrastructure required overhead, combined with patient differences (sicker, older patients trend hospital vs. younger, less debilitated patients trending free-standing locations), necessitates a site different payment model (such as current).

In the post-acute space, payment site neutrality has been bandied about by MedPAC for some time.  Up to now, the concept of payment site neutrality has languished due to disparate payment systems in provider niches’.  SNFs and their RUGs markedly different from Home Health and its OASIS and no similarity with LTACHs in the least. Now, with post-acute payments narrowing conceptually on “patient-driven” models (PDPM and PDGM) that use diagnoses and case-mix as payment levers, its possible CMS is setting a framework to site neutral payments in post-acute settings.

In its March 2015 report to Congress, MedPAC called for CMS to create site neutrality for certain patient types between SNFs and IRFs (Inpatient Rehab Facilities).   While both have separate PPS systems for payment, the IRF payment is typically more generous than the SNF payment, though care may look very similar in certain cases.  For IRFs, payment is based on the need/extent of rehab services then modified by the presence or lack of co-morbidities.  IRFs however, have payment enhancements/ additions for high-cost outliers and treating low-income patients; neither applies in the SNF setting.

The lines of care distinction between the two providers today, certainly between the post-acute focused SNFs and an IRF, can be difficult to discern.  For example, both typically staff a full complement of therapists (PT, OT, Speech), care oversight by an RN 24 hours per day, physician engagement daily or up to three times per week, etc.  Where IRFs used to distinguish themselves by providing three hours (or more) of therapy, SNFs today can and do, provide the same level.  As a good percentage of seniors are unable to tolerate the IRF therapy service levels, SNFs offer enhanced flexibility in care delivery as their payment is not predicated (directly) on care intensity.  What is known is that the payment amounts for comparable patient encounters are quite different.  For example, a stroke patient treated in an IRF vs. an SNF runs $5,000 plus higher.  An orthopedic case involving joint replacement differs by $4,000 or more.  Per MedPAC the difference in outcomes is negligible, if at all.  From the MedPac perspective, equalized payments for strokes, major joint replacements and hip/femur related surgical conditions (e.g., fracture) between IRFs and SNFs made sense, at least on a “beta” basis.  With no rule making authority, MedPac’s recommendation stalled and today, may be somewhat sidelined by other value-based concepts such as bundled payments (CJR for example).

So the question that begs is whether site neutral payments are near or far on the horizon for post-acute providers.  While this will sound like “bet-hedging”, I’ll claim the mid-term area, identifying sooner rather than later.  Consider the following.

  • Post-acute care is the fastest growing, reimbursed segment of health care by Medicare.
  • The landscape is changing dramatically as Medicare Advantage plans have shifted historic utilization patterns (shorter stays, avoidance of inpatient stays for certain procedures, etc.).
  • Medicare Advantage days as a percentage of total reimbursed days under Medicare are growing. One-third of all Medicare beneficiaries were enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan in 2017.  Executives at United Healthcare believe that Medicare Advantage penetration will eclipse 50% in the next 5 to 10 years.  As more Boomers enter Medicare eligibility age, their familiarity with managed care and the companies thereto plus general favorability with the product makes them quick converts to Medicare Advantage.
  • Managed care has to a certain extent, created site preference and site based value payment approaches already.  There is market familiarity for steering beneficiaries to certain sites and/or away from higher cost locations.  The market has come to accept a certain amount of inherent rationing and price-induced controls.
  • At the floor of recent payment system changes forthcoming is an underlying common-thread: Diagnoses driven, case-mix coordinated payments.  PDPM and PDGM are more alike in approach than different.  IRFs already embrace a modified case-mix, diagnoses sensitive payment system. Can homogenization among these be all that far away?
  • There are no supply shortage or access problems for patients.  In fact, the SNF industry could and should shrink by about a third over the next five years, just to rationalize supply to demand and improve occupancy fortunes.  There is no home health shortage, save that which is temporary due to staffing issues in certain regions (growth limited by available labor rather than bricks and mortar or outlets). Per MedPac, the average IRF occupancy rate pre-2017 was 65%.  It has not grown since.  In fact, the Medicare utilization of IRFs for certain conditions such as other neurologic and stroke (the highest utilization category) has declined. (Note: In 2004 CMS heightened enforcement of compliance thresholds for IRFs and as a result, utilization under Medicare has shrunk).
  • Despite payment reductions, Home Health has grown steadily as has other non-Medicare outlets for post-acute care (e.g., Assisted Living and non-medical/non-Medicare home health services).  Though the growth in non-Medicare post-acute services has caused some alarm due to lax regulations, CMS sees this trend favorably as it is non-reimbursed and generally, patient preferred.
  • Demonstration projects that are value-based and evidence of payment following the patient or “episode based” rather than “site based” are showing favorable results.  In general, utilization of higher cost sites is down, costs are down, and patient outcomes and satisfaction are as good if not better, than the current fee-for-service market.  Granted, there are patient exceptions by diagnoses and co-morbidity but as a general rule, leaving certain patients as outliers, the results suggest a flatter, site neutral payment is feasible.

If there is somewhat of  a “crystal ball” preview, it just may be in the fate of the OPPS site neutral proposal.  I think the direction is unequivocal but timing is everything.  My prediction: Site neutral payments certainly, between IRFs and SNFs are on the near horizon (within three years) and overall movement toward payments that follow the patient by case-mix category and diagnoses are within the next five to seven years.

October 2, 2018 Posted by | Home Health, Policy and Politics - Federal, Skilled Nursing | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Upcoming Webinar: Reducing Hospitalizations and SNF Reimbursement Implications

I am conducting a webinar on Thursday, November 8 regarding the strategies SNFs can and should employ to reduce unnecessary hospital transfers/hospitalizations (E.R. visits and inpatient admissions).  Value-based purchasing has just taken hold in the SNF realm with facilities about to experience their first outcome October 1, 2018 (incentive or reduction).  I’ll cover the policy implications but moreover, review upcoming reimbursement issues beyond just VBP, delving into the care transition (hospitalization) implications that are woven in PDPM.  For example, with PDPM instilling a critical focus on length of stay via imbedded payment reductions after day 20, facilities will naturally look to shorten lengths of stay perhaps at the peril of VBP (Value-Based Purchasing) implications.

During the hour-long session, I’ll address;

  • Reimbursement and policy related implications associated with unnecessary care transitions/hospitalizations under VBP but also, tangential to QRP, PDPM, Five Star QMs, survey and relative to the IMPACT Act.
  • Proven strategies with tools to identify transition risk, monitor performance and benchmark an SNF against its peers.
  • How to leverage good performance in a competitive market and to gain market share in a bundled payment, Medicare Advantage, pay-for-performance environment.

More information and registration information is available at this link.

http://hcmarketplace.com/reducing-readmissions

 

September 13, 2018 Posted by | Policy and Politics - Federal, Skilled Nursing | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

SNF Final Rule 2019: Key Points and Provisions

Beginning yesterday, I’ve been following the news regarding CMS’ annual issuance of Final PPS rules for providers.  Of greatest interest is the SNF Final Rule as it includes a completely new payment system, departing from the RUGS IV, therapy-centric system currently in-place.  I’ve read through the Final Rule (all 424 mind-numbing pages) and summarized what SNFs need to know right now. I will undoubtedly expand upon the PDPM model as more is known and I’ve modeled claims via provider experience data.

RATE: The Final Rule includes a 2.4% increase to SNFs via adjustments to the RUGS IV categories/CMIs.  NOTE:  Providers that have not met their QRP (Quality Reporting) requirements/data submissions will receive a .04% increase – net of the 2% penalty.

SNF QRP: There were no changes made to the SNF QRPs in this rule.  The Claims-Based Measures of, 1) Community/Post-Acute discharge; 2) Preventable re-hospitalizations (30 days post discharge), and; 3) Spending per Medicare beneficiary (SNF) remain.  The Assessment-Based Measures of , 1) Falls with injury; 2) New or worsening pressure injuries post-admission, and; 3) Percent of patients with functional admission and discharge assessments and care plans.  CMS did indicate that it will adopt a “burden” or return on investment test for adoption or removal of future measures.

SNF VBP: The impact of Value-Based Purchasing begins Oct. 1, 2018. This incorporates an incentive payment or penalty reduction for the lone applicable quality measure: 30 day re-hospitalization rates post SNF discharge.  The Final Rule includes notably, an extraordinary circumstances exception policy plus discussion on future baseline periods for measurement, scoring changes, etc.

PDPM: This new payment system (Patient Driven Payment Model) is set to go into effect on October 1, 2019 (FY 2020). It will replace the RUGS IV system.  It is case-mix driven, utilizing the MDS assessment tool to categorize resident care needs via five case-mix categories: Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Nursing, and Non-Therapy Ancillary requirements.  The base non-clinical case-mix category remains which captures the room and board and capital costs for SNFs (technical stuff here so no need for detail). As part of PDPM, only three assessments (MDS) are needed/required. The first is correlated to admission, the second to discharge and the third is related to change in condition/change in need.  Payment, regardless of service utilization, is assessment driven via each case-mix category.  Also gone from this system is any intensity measure of therapy services (no minute requirements or frequency). Added to the therapy requirements is a provision that as much as 25% (aggregate) of therapy treatment time can be group or concurrent.  Based on data provided, the unadjusted Federal Urban PDPM rate (10/1/2019) would be $410.85 (before labor/wage adjustments). The Unadjusted Rural PDPM rate would be $425.37.

As in the Proposed Rule, PDPM incorporates a variable rate concept.  The Final Rule maintained this concept unaltered.  After day 20, rates begin to decline at a pace equal to 2% every 7 days, starting at day 21.  The decline correlates to reductions in PT and OT rates (.03 per day) and a reduction in NTA (Non-Therapy Ancillary).  More below on Non-Therapy Ancillary inclusions.

Under PDPM, residents are classified/coded via ICD 10 into one (only one) of ten clinical categories corresponding to the primary reason for the inpatient stay. CMS intends to map ICD-10 codes into the clinical categories for providers.

  1. Major Joint Replacement or Spinal Surgery
  2. Cancer
  3. Non-Surgical Orthopedic/Musculoskeletal
  4. Pulmonary
  5. Orthopedic (that doesn’t fall into #1)
  6. Cardiovascular and Coagulations
  7. Acute Infections
  8. Acute Neurologic
  9. Medical Management
  10. Non-Orthopedic Surgery

To accommodate higher-cost, sicker patients in the SNF setting, PDPM implements a Non-Therapy Ancillary case-mix. The NTA categories are below.  Other than the first category of HIV/AIDS, each NTA is picked-up from a corresponding MDS item. Sorry for the length but I think the list is informative for providers.

HIV/AIDS 

Parenteral IV Feeding: Level High

Special Treatments/Programs: Intravenous Medication Post-admit

Special Treatments/Programs: Ventilator or Respirator Post-admit

Parenteral IV feeding: Level Low

Lung Transplant Status

Special Treatments/Programs: Transfusion Post-admit

Major Organ Transplant Status, Except Lung

Active Diagnoses: Multiple Sclerosis Code

Opportunistic Infections

Active Diagnoses: Asthma COPD Chronic Lung Disease Code

Bone/Joint/Muscle Infections/Necrosis – Except Aseptic Necrosis of Bone

Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

Wound Infection

Active Diagnoses: Diabetes Mellitus (DM)

Endocarditis

Immune Disorders

End-Stage Liver Disease

Other Foot Skin Problems: Diabetic Foot Ulcer

Narcolepsy and Cataplexy

Cystic Fibrosis

Special Treatments/Programs: Tracheostomy Care Post-admit

Active Diagnoses: Multi-Drug Resistant Organism (MDRO)

Special Treatments/Programs: Isolation Post-admit

Specified Hereditary Metabolic/Immune Disorders

Morbid Obesity

Special Treatments/Programs: Radiation Post-admit

Highest Stage of Unhealed Pressure Ulcer – Stage 4

Psoriatic Arthropathy and Systemic Sclerosis

Chronic Pancreatitis

Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy and Vitreous Hemorrhage

Other Foot Skin Problems: Foot Infection Code, Other Open Lesion on Foot

Complications of Specified Implanted Device or Graft

Bladder and Bowel Appliances: Intermittent Catheterization

Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Aseptic Necrosis of Bone

Special Treatments/Programs: Suctioning Post-admit

Cardio-Respiratory Failure and Shock

Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Myelofibrosis

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Other Connective Tissue Disorders, and Inflammatory Spondylopathies

Diabetic Retinopathy – Except Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy and Vitreous Hemorrhage

Nutritional Approaches While a Resident: Feeding Tube

Severe Skin Burn or Condition

Intractable Epilepsy

Active Diagnoses: Malnutrition

Disorders of Immunity – Except : RxCC97: Immune Disorders

Cirrhosis of Liver 

Bladder and Bowel Appliances: Ostomy

Respiratory Arrest

Pulmonary Fibrosis and Other Chronic Lung Disorders

Summary: Ten clinical categories essentially begin the coding process (reason for admit).  From this point, each case-mix category is developed (PT, OT, SLP, Nursing and NTA). This is done via the admission MDS.  The rate is constant for days 1-20 of the stay.  Beginning on day 21, the rate reduces equal to 2% every additional 7 days.  A change of condition MDS can occur, altering the rate variability (reduction) by change in patient need.  One more assessment (MDS) is completed to recap the stay at discharge and capture QRP data.  In the meantime, stay tuned for additional information and strategic tips on how to prepare for PDPM and what specifically, to know in interpreting the “best path/best-practices” at the facility level.

 

August 1, 2018 Posted by | Skilled Nursing | , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

SNF PPS Final Rule 2019

Yesterday I wrote a quick post regarding the news that CMS was about to issue the SNF Final Rule for Fiscal Year 2019.  Today, the text is available.  Official publication in the Federal Register is set for August 8th.  Readers may access the text here: SNF 2019 Final Rule

I will have analysis and more information available regarding the Final Rule implications for providers later today.  NOTE: Biggest implications center on the shift away from RUGS IV to PDPM (new payment model).  That shift/change occurs 10/1/19 unless otherwise delayed.  On this site, on the Reports and Other Documents page, there is a PDPM calculation worksheet for download.  You can also access it here via this link: PDPM Calculation for SNFs

The worksheet is a good tool/review to grasp the basic mechanics of PDPM and how rates are/will be derived.

August 1, 2018 Posted by | Skilled Nursing | , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Five Post Acute Axioms (Truisms)

I read a lot – part of the job.  I hear lots of conversations and participate in many in-person and online.  Last week, I spent a few evenings with my rehab partner.  Between he and my wife, with clients across the country, it was fascinating how the conversation regarding fortune or famine (providers) boiled down to a few simple truths.  Summarizing, those that do well have accepted and work doggedly at embracing and living out these axioms.  Those that are struggling, simply refuse to grasp these plain truths.  Regardless of the entity (SNF, HHA, etc.), these axioms apply (truthfully, for any provider including hospitals).

To preface, I’ve slimmed-down hours upon hours of recent conversations to these five “axioms”.  One could argue more apply.  Between my partners, my wife (a partner) and me, we have some context here as we work with multiple entities that rank in the top 1,000 post-acute providers in the nation.  For example, we all share a working relationship with the 6th ranked SNF in the nation, out of 15,636 SNFs.  Unfortunately, we also have client relationships with the lowest ranked providers including one that ranks 15,609.  This dichotomy (cruel as it is) gives us a unique perspective regarding truisms (embrace them and succeed, ignore them and fail).

  1. Quality Matters: This isn’t about hype or verbiage; it’s about results.  Organizations that are succeeding are doggedly, persistently and hyper-fixated on their care outcomes.  Their culture is deep in quality and they benchmark themselves and what they do, how they perform, with an effort on getting better all the time.  Their outcomes demonstrate their quality.
  2. Staffing Matters: Providers that perform invest in and have in number, great staff perform better.  They put the right people closest to the patients.  They have assessed their operations and know precisely, what levels of staff by credential and education, their operations require.  They train, teach and invest in their “troops”.  You won’t find a great SNF that doesn’t have RNs on every shift, every day.  You won’t find a great provider, HHA or SNF, etc., that doesn’t have actual employees, not contractors, taking care of patients (primarily).
  3. Excellence in Management and Leadership is Imperative: The best have long-term, highly qualified management and leadership at every level in the organization.  They retain great talent and grow it like a prized rose-bush (ever watch rose “aficionados” you’ll get the reference). These folks aren’t the highest paid or even with the most credentials; they are excellent directors of task and people.  The most credentialed (education, certifications, etc.) don’t correlate to the best manager or leader.  In a nutshell: Excellence here means bright, strategic, engaged, earnest, industry and trade experts, that are quality driven.
  4. The Devil is in the Details: The best providers are not just current with policy issues and reimbursement trends, they are ahead and know the implications and manage to these details.  For example, they know length-of-stay matters and they are working to shorten each encounter to only the resources required (days, visits, etc.).  Their quality measures are excellent because they review the dozens of measurable data points to look for trends and to track outcomes.  They have protocols and disease pathways in-place.  They adopted antibiotic stewardship practices before the buzzword existed.  They already were on pain and the management thereof, without or minimizing opioids, before alarms sounded.  They had steps in place to quality review care transitions and hospitalizations.  QAPI was something new but not to them.  Doing things right was and still is, the driver for these excellent organizations.
  5. The Organization is like a Car: This is meant to be a silly reference but also serious.  Driving is all about what is going on ahead of you and being anticipatory and prepared.  The rearview mirror is checked but only briefly.  Failure to pay attention to the road ahead and anticipate hazards, keep safe distances, etc. is how one arrives at a destination, safely and efficiently. Think of it this way: Slow is smooth, smooth is fast (an old and time-honored, Special Forces reference). Great providers embrace this philosophy – do things slowly, smoothly to be able to respond quickly when necessary.  What differentiates the very best providers from the very worst is their focus on FORWARD – being very anticipatory and developing core, innate competencies that help be “smooth and fast” as adaptation is required in health care.

Food for thought.  If one chooses to use the above points on a comparative basis, my guess is you will find what I know.  The best embrace these axioms.  The worst don’t or don’t consistently.  Everyone else in the middle has a choice to make – get better or get worse.  The truth about “great’ in health care is easy to understand.

 

July 16, 2018 Posted by | Home Health, Skilled Nursing | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Stuck in Neutral: Bundled Payments and Post-Acute Providers

After CMS nixed the mandatory expansion provisions for Bundled Payments and reduced the metro areas participating in CJR (joint replacement), the prospects for post-acute provider involvement in non-fee-for-service initiatives (payments and incentives based on disease states and care episodes) went in to limbo.  With a fair amount of excitement and trepidation building on the part of the post-acute world about different payment methodologies, new network arrangements, new partnerships, incentive possibilities, etc., CMS put the brakes on the “revolution”; a screeching halt.

While Bundled Payments aren’t dead by any means, the direct relationships for post-acute providers are in “neutral”.  The Bundled Payments for Care Improvement Advanced (BPCI Advanced) initiative announced in January included no avenue for SNFs, HHAs (home health) to apply and participate.  Nationally, other voluntary bundle programs continue including the remnants of CJR, and Models 2, 3 and 4 in Phase II.  According to CMS, as of April of this year, 1100 participants were involved in Phase 2 initiatives.  The Phase 2 initiatives cover 48 episodes of care ranging from diabetes, through various cardiac issues and disease to UTIs.

BPCI Advanced opportunities (episode initiators) involve hospitals or physician groups.  Post-acute will still play a role but the direct connections and incentives aren’t quite tangible or specific, compared to CJR.  Time will tell how the roles for post-acute providers evolve in/with BPCI Advanced.  Oddly enough, the economic realities of care utilization and negative outcome risk suggest that post-acute should play a direct, large role. As hospital stays shorten, outpatient and non-acute hospital surgical procedures increase, the directed discharge to post-acute has taken on greater meaning in the care journey.  HHAs in particular, are playing an expanded role in reducing costs via enhancements to their ability to care for more post-surgical cases direct from the hospital/surgical location.  Simultaneous however, readmission risk exposure increases.  What is certain is that system-wide, the window of 30 to 90 days post hospital or acute episode is where significant efficiency, quality and cost savings improvement lies.

While the direct opportunities initially forecast under BPCI for the post-acute industry have evaporated (for now), strategic benefits and opportunities remain.  Providers should not stray from a path and process that focuses on enhancing care coordination, improving quality and managing resource utilization.  Consider the following:

  1. For SNFs, PDPM (new proposed Medicare reimbursement model) incorporates payment changes and reductions based on length of stay (longer stays without condition change, decrease payment after a set time period).  A premium is being placed on getting post-acute residents efficiently, through their inpatient stay.
  2. For HHAs, payment reform continues to focus on shorter episodes in the future.  Like PDPM for SNFs, the focus is on efficiency and moving the patient through certain recuperative and rehabilitative phases, expeditiously.
  3. Medicare Advantage plans are increasing market share nationwide.  In some markets, 60% of the post-acute days and episodes are covered by Medicare Advantage plans – not fee-for-service. These plans concentrate on utilization management, ratcheting stay/episode length and payment amounts, down.  Providers that again, are efficient and coordinate care effectively will benefit by focused referrals and  improved volumes.
  4. Quality matters more than ever before – for all providers.  Star ratings are increasingly important in terms of attracting and retaining referral patterns  Networks and Medicare Advantage plans are focused on sourcing the highest rated providers.  Upstream referral sources, concerned about readmission risks are targeting their discharges to the higher rated providers.  Consumers are also becoming more market savvy, seeking information on quality and performance.  And of course, government programs such as Value-Based Purchasing place providers with poor performance on key measures (readmissions for SNFs) in the reimbursement reduction pool.
  5. Indirectly, Bundled Payment initiatives move forward and the Advanced option will require physicians and hospitals that participate, to source the best referral partners or lose incentive dollars and inherit unwarranted readmission risk.  SNFs and HHAs that excel at care coordination, length of stay management, have disease pathways in-place, can manage treatment, diagnostic and pharmacology expenses and produce exceptional outcomes and patient satisfaction are the preferred partners.

June 29, 2018 Posted by | Home Health, Policy and Politics - Federal, Skilled Nursing | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Interoperability and Post-Acute Implications

I’m not sure how many of my readers are following the subject and CMS stance/policy on interoperability among providers but the concepts and resultant debate are rather interesting.  I am trying to encourage as many clients and readers to tune-in on this subject as the implications are sweeping – positively and negatively.

Interoperability in this context means the ability of computer systems or software to exchange and/or make use of information for functional purposes.  In health care, the genesis of the interoperability concept began with HIPAA in the nineties.  HIPAA spawned the HITECH Act in 2009 which ultimately created Meaningful Use.  For anyone unfamiliar with Meaning Use and its incentive provisions, think no further than Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) and quality reporting.  The IMPACT Act is an analogous outgrowth of blended concepts between Meaningful Use, Value-Based Purchasing and Interoperability.  Conceptually, the goal is to create data measures that have “meaning” in terms of clinical conditions, outcomes, patient care and economics.  Ideally, data that matters and can be shared will improve outcomes, improve standardization of care and treatment processes and reduce cost through reduced waste and duplication.  Sounds simple and logical enough.

In April of this year, with the roll-out of various provider segment Inpatient PPS proposed rules for FY 2019, CMS included proposals to strengthen and expedite, interoperability.  The concept is contained within the SNF and Hospital proposed rules.  The twist however, is that CMS is changing its tone from “voluntary” to “mandatory” regarding expediting or advancing, interoperability. Up until this point, Meaningful Use projects that advanced interoperability goals were incentive driven; no punishment.  Among the options CMS is willing to pursue to advance interoperability are new Conditions of Participation and Conditions for Coverage that may include reimbursement implications (negative) and fines for non-compliance and non-advancement.  In the SNF 2019 Proposed Rule, providers are mandated to use the 2015 Edition of Certified Health Record/Information Technology in order to qualify for incentive payments under VBP and avoid reimbursement reduction(s).  For those interested, the 2015 Certified EHR Technology requirement summary is available here: final2015certedfactsheet.022114

The possible implications for providers are numerous – positive and negative.  The greatest positive implication is a (hopeful) rapid escalation of software systems that can share functional data directly without having to build and maintain separate interfaces (third-party).  Likewise, the proposed regulations will facilitate faster development of Health Information Exchanges (HIEs).  Many states have operating HIEs but provider participation and investment has been limited.  A quick interoperability interchange is via an HIE versus separate, unique data and software platform integration.  As SNFs and HHAs have MDS and OASIS assessment requirements on admission, fluid patient history, diagnoses/coding exchange and treatment history will facilitate faster and more accurate, MDS/OASIS completion – a real winner. Dozens of other “tasky” issues can be addressed as well such as portions of drug reconciliation requirements by diagnosis on admission, review of lab and other diagnostic results, order interchanges and interfaces, etc.

The most negative implication for providers is COST.  In reality, the post-acute side of health care isn’t really data savvy and hasn’t really kept pace with software and technology developments.  Many providers are small.  Many providers are rural. Many providers maintain primarily paper records and use technology only minimally.  Full EHR for them is impractical and with present reimbursement levels, unlikely any time soon.  The second most negative implication for providers is the fragmentation that exists among the system developers and software companies in the health care industry.  The “deemed” proprietary nature of systems and their software codes has limited collaboration and cooperation necessary to advance interoperability. HIEs were supposed to remedy this problem but alas, not yet and not at the magnitude-level CMS is foretelling within its Proposed Rules.

Interoperability is needed and amazing, conceptually.  The return is significant in terms of improvements in outcomes and reductions in waste and cost.  Unfortunately, the provider community remains too fragmented and inversely incentivized today to jump ahead faster (money not tied to integration and initiatives among providers).  Software systems don’t work between providers in fashions that support the interoperability goals.  More troubling: the economics are daunting for providers that are not seeing any additional dollars in their reimbursements, capable of supporting the capital and infrastructure needs part and parcel to additional (and faster), interoperability.

 

June 27, 2018 Posted by | Home Health, Policy and Politics - Federal, Skilled Nursing | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment