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Health Care Leadership: Why its Hard, Why Many Fail and What it Takes to Succeed

The bulk of my work centers around gathering data, analyzing trends and working with the leadership of various organizations to implement strategy or more centered, strategies.  The process is iterative, interactive and always fascinating.  Throughout my career, I’ve worked within (virtually) every health care industry segment and seniors housing segment. I also counsel and have worked with entities that buy, sell, invest in, consult with, account for, finance, and research health care and seniors housing businesses. Its my work with the latter that is the genesis of this post and my decades of work with the former that is the “content”.

There are two fundamental reasons why health care leadership is hard and different from leadership duties in other industries: 24/7 demands and the immediacy of the customer to the enterprise.  Health care and seniors housing (regardless of the segment specific) never closes, has no true seasonality, and demand can increase and decrease with equal force and equal pace, almost entirely related to external factors and forces.  Pricing for the most part, other than seniors housing, is almost immaterial and unrelated to revenue.  No other, non-governmental, business is as regulated and scrutinized and mandated transparent than health care.  Likewise, no other business has the mandate that the full array and intensity of all services must be available 24/7, on immediate demand, with no ability to defer, fallow, or limit.  Even a 24 hour PDQ won’t have all services available constantly (if the hot dogs run out, they are gone!).

While other industries will have close customer contact, health care has a unique, and intimate relationship with its customers.  In SNFs, Assisted Living Facilities, Seniors Housing, etc. the customer is present for long-periods (years).  In hospitals, the customer is present for hours, days, up to weeks at a time (the latter rare unless we are talking LTAcH).  In the health care setting, the enterprise has total responsibility for all needs of the customer – great to small.  The quality of care and service to all needs matters and is measured, reported and today in many regards, tied to compensation. Back to the PDQ, the over-done hot dog costs the same and there is no governmental entity that maintains a hotline for customer reports and investigations regarding the quality of the hot dog.

In health care, there is a very unique and in many ways, perverted twist concerning the customer relationship.  The customer today is a Dr. Jekyll/Mr. Hyde manifestation.  No other industry has customers that are bifurcated as such – the payer being a consumer unique and separate from the actual present being.  Health care entities, to be successful, must satisfy both and manage the expectations of both, seamless and fluid to each party.  I know of no other industry where on any given day in a hospital for example, where it is likely that of 300 individual inpatients there are dozens more of the payer/insurer consumers requiring unique attention, simultaneously.  Miss a step, miss a form, etc. and the payer consumer refuses to pay for the human consumer that is receiving or received the care.

Because of the “constant” nature and customer relationships (coupled with many other reasons of course), health care leadership is hard.  It is hard because these two fundamental components are nearly, completely, out of the control of the leader.  The leader can only react or respond but truly, never change the paradigm or structure and always, in terms of the payer customer, sit beholding to the rule changing process and bureaucracy of the payer customer.  This last element can be unbelievably insidious.  For example, in the State of Kansas, dozens of SNFs face grave peril in terms of solvency because the State cannot efficiently certify eligibility for Medicaid for qualified seniors.  The delay has left dozens of facilities with Medicaid IOUs at six digits and climbing – the human customer receiving care, the paying customer bureaucratically inept and unwilling and incapable of paying its bills, and the SNF sitting with no real recourse.

Given the above, its frankly easy to see why so many leaders fail or simply, give up.  The deck is stacked toward failure.  On the expense side of the equation, because of mounting regulation, fewer elements are within a leader’s control.  With a rare exception, revenue is completely beyond control in terms of price and reimbursement for services provided.  With RAC and other audits, revenue initially earned can be retrospectively recast and denied.  (The PDQ six month’s later decides to recoup payment for the hot dog because, in its infinite wisdom, you didn’t need to the eat the hot dog or you should have made a wiser food choice).  The overwhelming variables that can contribute to failure in a micro and macro sense for a leader are not lessening.  His/her organization is open and under scrutiny, 24/7.  He/she must oversee and be accountable for the health outcomes of a human customer that in turn are interpreted by the payer customer (remotely), subject to alteration, and retroactive scrutiny.  Today, success isn’t just based on what occurred at the point of service but after the service concluded.  The enterprise is at-risk for human behavior (compliance and non-compliance) of the consumer for not just days post service but months.  Further, the enterprise is at-risk for the satisfaction of a consumer whose behavior and lifestyle may have significantly contributed to his/her need for care and service initially.  As one executive told me recently; “We have to tell people the truth about their disease, figure out how to make it sound good and nice, and hope that we have done so in such a life affirming fashion that the patient will give us 5 stars for service.  Figure that one out”.  Alas, perhaps failure is inevitable.

Aside from failure correlating to burn out or shear “giving up” (the average large system executive tenure is less than 10 years), the failure in leadership that I see resides primarily in two areas.  The first is an inability or lack of willingness to realize that the paradigm is constantly changing today and the pace of which, is accelerating.  It is human nature to seek equilibrium; to pursue elements of stasis and calm. The same ( is) anathema to leading a health care enterprise.  The second area is aversion to risk.  Precisely because of the first point, taking risk or being capable of tolerating large elements of risk is imperative today in health care.  The best leaders are true entrepreneurs today.  They see opportunity and are willing to pursue it with vigor.  They find the niches and pursue them.  Every bureaucracy and rapidly changing industry paradigm begets opportunity with equal pace and ferocity.  For example, the growing “private, non-reimbursed” service sectors in health care that continue to grow and flourish because of and in-spite of the heavily regulated, price tied market.  I know of and have consulted for, provider groups that have moved further away from Medicare and managed care to private payment with phenomenal success.  Was the strategy a risk?  Yes.  Most would not take this type of risk.  I am harkened however by the notion that at times, the greatest risk present is the risk of doing nothing.

Successful leadership and leaders today, those that I know, have the ability to think systematically and algebraically – to solve the industry polynomials with all of the variables.  They are inquisitive by nature and unwilling to accept the status quo, regardless of where and why.  They embrace the famed Pasteur quote: “Chance (luck) favors the prepared mind”.  They also have the soul and panache (tempered) of Capt. Jack Sparrow (from Pirates of the Caribbean).  They like risk and have the entrepreneurial heart and mind to innovate and move fluidly through problems and challenges such that the same are opportunities.  They don’t allow their enterprises to become complacent or bureaucratic.

Today, success is about better – better products, better service, and better care.  Payers are demanding accountability and want an increasing level of care and service for lower levels of payment.  That is the paradigm and it is moving to higher levels of accountability and lower levels of overall payment.  The best execs know this and don’t quibble with it (much).  They realize that success if about adapting the enterprise accordingly while finding the pliable spots that such an environment creates.  These spots are service lines, system enhancements, productivity improvements, and different levels of patient engagement.  Similarly, they realize the risk limits of concentration – too much exposure to certain payers.  They have seen this trend coming and have already moved.  For those still trying to reverse or slow the trend, this is where failure first begins ( the search for stasis in a rapidly changing world).

 

April 1, 2016 Posted by | Assisted Living, Home Health, Hospice, Senior Housing, Skilled Nursing | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Getting CCRC Feasibility Studies Correct … and Other Studies as Well

In my consulting career, I’ve done a fair amount of feasibility work (market, economic, etc.).  Similarly, I’ve done a fair amount of similar analyses, primarily related to M&A activity and/or where financing is involved (debt covenant reviews, etc.). Heck, I’ve even done some bankruptcy related work!  I’m also queried fairly often about feasibility, demand, market studies, etc. such that I’m surprised (often enough) that a gap still exists between “proper” analysis and simplified “demographic” analysis.  Suffice to say, feasibility work is not a “one size” fits all relationship.

I’ve titled this post “CCRC feasibility” principally because the unique nature of a true CCRC project provides a framework to discuss a multitude of related industry segments simultaneously (e.g., seniors housing, health care, assisted living, etc.).  Starting with the CCRC concept, a set of basic assumptions about the feasibility process is required.

  • Demographics aren’t the arbiter of success or failure – feasibility or lack thereof.
  • Demand isn’t solely correlated to like unit occupancy, demographics (now or projected), or for that matter, how many units are projected to be built (following the Jones’ as a qualifier).
  • Capital accessibility isn’t relevant nor should it be.
  • National trends for the most part, are immaterial.  Local, regional and state are, however.
  • Projects pre-supposed are projects with inherent risk attached.  This isn’t an “if you build it, they will come” type exercise.  The results shouldn’t be thought of as a justification for a “specific” project already planned.

The last point typically generates  a “heresy” cry from folks and certain industry segments. Regardless, I am adamant here in so much that true feasibility analyses determines “what makes sense” rather or as opposed to, justifying that which is planned (or the implication that the client is paying for a study to justify his/her project).  Remember, I am a fan of the fabled quote from Mark Twain attributed to Benjamin Disraeli (the former Prime Minister of Great Britain): “There are three types of lies….lies, damn lies and statistics”.  As an economist, I have deep appreciation for this as all too often, I see analyses that smack of this latter type of lie.

(Note: The source of the actual “lies, damn lies” quote is still a mystery…thought initially to be said by Lord Courtney in 1895 but since, proven invalid.)

Carrying this feasibility discussion just a bit further, the approach that I recommend (and use) incorporates the following key assumptions about seniors housing (CCRCs) and to a lesser extent, specialized care facilities (Assisted Living, SNFs, etc.).

  • The demand for seniors housing, true housing, is very price elastic.  Given the elasticity, all demand work must be sensitized by price. The more specialized or unique the project might or may be, the more sensitive the demand elasticity becomes (greater or lesser).
  • Local economic conditions matter – tremendously.  This is particularly true for CCRCs and higher-end seniors housing projects, especially real estate conditions.
  • Regional and state trends matter particularly the migration patterns, policy issues, job issues, etc.  Doubt me?  Let’s have a discussion about the great State of Illinois (for disclosure, I have a home and office in Illinois).
  • Location(s) matter.  I incorporate location/central place theory elements in all of my feasibility work and analyses.
  • Demographics are important but not in the normative sense.  Yes, age and income qualified numbers are important but education and real estate ownership, location and years residency in the market area(s) can be as impactful.
  • Competition is important but in all forms.  Given the demand elasticity of seniors housing, the higher the price, the greater the wealth status required of the potential consumer, the greater the options available to that same consumer.
  • Ratios matter.  The demographics are important but the ratio within the demographic correlated to the project, within various locations, etc. is “money”.  (Sales folks love this stuff).  How many seniors does it take to fill a CCRC?

Because no one project is equal to another, feasibility work and like analysis is both (an) art and a science.  I liken the process to cooking.  Recipes are key but taste and flair and creativity are important as well.  Honestly, knowing the industry well from an overall perspective is ideal – like being a chef trained by the masters!  When I see flawed analysis, it typically comes from a source that follows a recipe; a recipe for market analysis, etc.  Knowing the industry, having operated organizations or facilities, being trained in quantitative analysis, etc. separates good or great from average.  Remember Twain/Disraeli.

So to the title of this post; the correct or proper methodology for feasibility studies and similar analysis (sans some detail for brevity and not in any particular order)….

New Facility/New Location

  • Location Analysis – in economic parlance, the application of elements of Central Place Theory.  This includes a review of the site in relationship to key ranked variables such as market/demographics, accessibility, staff/employment access, proximity to other healthcare, other services, etc.
  • Pricing – what is/are the core pricing assumption(s)….I’ve written on strategic pricing models on this site.  If I am doing the pricing work, I apply the concepts in the Strategic Pricing presentations and worksheets found on the Reports and Other Documents page on this site.
  • Demographics – I’ll use my pricing data and my location analysis to frame my demographic analysis.  Aside from age and income, I’ll look at migration patterns, education, career history, etc. plus I’ll review the information on a geocoded basis to refine market relationships between customers and other competitors.
  • Demand Analysis – From the demographic data and tested against the pricing, I’ll build a demand analysis and a penetration analysis that provides a range of likely target customers, within the market areas, give the pricing information, for a particular product.  Historic migration and market area occupancy of like accommodations is used to sensitize the demand analysis.
  • Economic Analysis – This is a review of current market conditions and trends that can impact the project’s feasibility, positively or negatively.  Real estate, income, employment, business investment, economic outlooks, policy implications such as tax policy, etc. are all key elements reviewed.
  • Competitive Analysis – What is going on within the area/regional competition of like or quasi-comparable projects is important as a buffer or moreover, a stability (or lack thereof) check.  I like to look at all potential or as many as practical, comparable living accommodations – not just seniors housing (condos, apartments, etc.).

Expansion Projects

I will complete a major portion of the above with less time spent on location analysis and pricing work (though pricing is still key for accurate demand).  I have watched organizations cannibalize their own market share and occupancy levels with expansion projects so accurate gauging of current and pent-up demand is critical along with conditional trends (economic, competitive analysis, etc.).

M&A, Financing, Etc. Projects

Again, all of the above work is relevant but depending on the circumstances, I will incorporate benchmark data from industry sub-sets.  For example, for SNFs I look at compliance information, CMS star ratings, staffing numbers, payer mix/quality mix and of course, federal and state reimbursement and policy trends.  When I review covenant defaults and provide reports, I narrow the analysis based on the core nature of the default but most often, the issues of late are occupancy, pricing, and revenue models versus fixed and variable cost levels.  Pricing work is often key along with a review of marketing strategies.

Is there more to this topic area?  Of course and this post isn’t meant to be exhaustive nor a text-book supplement.  It is however, a ready framework that can provide guidance to those looking at conducting or contracting for, a feasibility, financing or market analysis.  My advice: Getting it done right the first time saves money, prevents future problems, and assists with positive outcomes for any project or purpose.

February 23, 2016 Posted by | Assisted Living, Senior Housing, Skilled Nursing | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Modern Health Care Risk Management

The second most important function an executive and/or a governance board conducts (second only to planning) is risk management.  This key leadership function is evolving rapidly primarily due to the evolutionary movement around compliance (ACA, CMS, etc.) and the payer focal shift from episodic, procedural care to outcome or evidenced based care, pay-for-performance, etc.  Similarly, as government policy shifts so does commercial market dynamics with like movements toward pay-for-performance and disease management.  While the core concept of “enterprise” protection remains the same, the scope today is different, the breadth wider and the responsibilities and tasks more structured than say, ten plus years ago.

Risk management is the term that encompasses a series of activities, programs, policies, etc. that work (ideally) together to protect and secure the overall enterprise/organizational identity, value, market share, legal structure and by downstream relationship, the stakeholders/shareholders.  Its activities, etc. are passive and active.  Passive activities (examples) include the purchase of insurance  and implementation of firewalls and data security systems.  Active activities include audits, training of staff, QA/QI activities, customer/patient engagement programs, etc. The purpose of this post is to focus on the “active” elements and in particular, the most important elements today given the evolving environment and the new risks emerging.  The purpose is to frame a model of risk prevention culture rather than an environment fraught with rule deontology and protectionism.  The latter tends to breed its own kind of risk(s) in addition to the risk(s) it seeks mitigate.

I like to think of effective risk management plans today as having six key elements.  Importantly, the plan is not operative while the elements are.  The plan is what the organization uses to monitor the completion (activities), ongoing improvement (identification and address of organizational weakness and vulnerability), and accountability of management in identifying and managing risk. Remember, these elements are the “active” side.  I, for sake of the theme of this article, will assume that providers acquire adequate insurance policies utilizing industry professionals in their development plus that they maintain modern IT infrastructure to secure patient data, etc.

  1. Organizational Focus on Patient Care Quality and Service: This isn’t about slogans or marketing rather, it is about having an overall and deeply integrated culture around patient care outcomes and satisfaction. In a pay-for-performance, competitive, ACO world, this element is key.
    • Executive and Board involvement in QA/QI, especially at the highest organizational levels.
    • Compensation for management and executives incorporating (heavily) patient outcomes and satisfaction to the degree that all other elements are dwarfed by the weight given to this measure.
    • Monitoring in-place of key patient outcome data and benchmarking of the same.
    • Monitoring of response and wait times.  This element is key as the goal is to create response times as near as possible/practical to immediate or to minimize wait times wherever possible.
    • A program of patient/family engagement that includes surveys, focus groups, etc.
    • A grievance resolution system that is open, accessible and seeks to address concerns as instantaneous as possible.  The approach must be around resolving concerns without delay and bureaucracy.
    • Staff training focused on customer service, QA/QI, communication and dealing with patient/family stress, trauma, etc.
    • Engagement of staff in a “bottom-up” program or approach whereby lower level line staff are engaged in all training, QA/QI processes, mentoring, etc.
  2. Audit Contractors and Sub-Contractors: The use of contractors such as physician intensivists (hospitalists) and therapy companies, imaging companies, lab providers, environmental service providers (laundry, housekeeping, etc.) is on the rise as organizations seek to control costs and improve efficiency.  Contractors, etc. yield new risk as their conduct, care, service, etc. create a risk transferable directly to the parent organization.  The risk of course, is multi-fold.  First, as applicable, is care risk (outcomes, service, competence, qualifications, insurance, etc.).  Second, is labor risk (legal status, background checks, etc.). Third, is billing risk and compliance risk.  If the contractor is involved in any element of care that is billable to a payer (Medicare, Medicaid, commercial insurance), the organization must assure complete compliance with billing and care provision rules in order to negate billing fraud or inappropriate claims risk (risk of non-payment or worse).  Summarized, organizations must monitor and audit, externally, the work of contractors.  Immunization clauses within contracts cannot supplant audits of risk areas proportional to the scope of the service agreement.  For example, the organization must audit its medical staff, the care provided, documentation, billing as applicable, patient contact and satisfaction, response times, etc.  The same is true for any care service contractor.
  3. Billing Audits: This element is particularly crucial for government programs such as Medicare and Medicaid.  Providers today must get in the habit of reviewing their claims submitted to payer sources, particularly the government.  Two huge risk areas are present today.  First, focused fraud actions against providers under the False Claims Act.  Audits here are all about making sure that what was billed was actually provided, documented, necessary and compliant. Second, billing accuracy such that claim submissions are “clean” and “accurate”.  Denials for inaccuracy, etc. can lead to imbalances in error rates and thus, probes and claims held for review.  The latter negatively impacts cash flow and staff productivity as extra work to justify payment is required. I also recommend that organizations be very, very careful about compensation programs tied to revenues and claims, especially without counter-balancing elements and a strong audit program.  I like billing audits that are third-party conducted, benchmarked against regional and national data (our business should look like others in the region and nationally) and occur episodically and randomly as frequent as monthly and certainly, no less than quarterly.
  4. Organizational Transparency and Staff Engagement: A huge risk area providers continue to face is the mixed message and incongruent messages sent to staff from leadership and at the highest levels of the organization.  The impetus behind so many False Claims investigations and actions undertaken by the DOJ (Department of Justice) isn’t smart federal auditors – its disgruntled staff.  Whistleblowers are the fundamental impetus behind False Claims allegations and actions. Mitigating this risk is simple (beyond doing the right things of course).  Organizations, especially leadership, must be transparent and as open and candid as possible.  The point here is that there really is no reason to not share goals, plans, operating data, etc. with staff.  When I was a CEO, my office was never locked and thus, work and files on my desk and credenza.  My compensation was open and I did not hide what I made or how I made it.  Not too surprising, across decades of running large healthcare organizations, I never had a fraud allegation or an allegation of any impropriety.  Staff knew what the corporate plans were, how they achieved compensation and bonuses, etc.  We gain-shared so staff had opportunities to reap reward as the organization grew and performed.  Staff engagement means at the planning and implementation levels.  It also means active programs of training and a large amount of dialogue regarding why the organization does what it does and where the right and wrong lie.  The same Whistleblower mentality is also fundamentally sound when it is used to police bad internal behavior, including that of management.
  5. Focus on Competence: A simple thing but rarely do I see this element boldly, prominently emphasized.  Competence is about the ability to do what is required at the professional, validated level.  It is about validation of core skills and abilities within a framework of education and testing.  Organizations that focus on developing and maintaining staff and managerial competence limit risk inherently.  All together, risk is often a byproduct of incompetence and protection of a weak, status quo.  If excellence and competence is demanded and the systems engaged and in-place to assure it, then there is little room for marginal, sub-standard and incompetent to remain.  How does an organization focus on competence?  First, eliminate old, worn out HR policies and job descriptions and performance evaluations and replace the same with competency and behavioral standards.  Competency standards are the elements one must demonstrate and perform as part of the job at a repetitive, proficient level.  Behavior standards are the elements of personal conduct and accountability that the organization demands (uniforms, attendance, inservice attendance, etc.). Evaluate standards routinely, move in new skills, refine old skills, educate and test.  Require ongoing passage and demonstration and be intolerant of employees and managers that can’t/won’t meet the competency and behavioral requirements.  Competency standards are required for ongoing employment; reward for performance thus can only and should only occur when the base standard is consistently exceeded.
  6. Be Public: By employing all of your constituents in oversight, the likelihood of getting surprised or being caught off guard is minimized.  Be public as possible with standards, expectations, contact information, grievance steps, etc.  Be open to all criticism and frankly, demand (as much possible) feedback regarding just about anything in the business.  No reason that business goals can’t be public and yes, even margin goals.  Heck, explain why margins are necessary.  Engage the broader universe and community and ask for input and reactions.  People will tell you the good, the bad and the ugly – the latter being where potential risk lies.  Force the conversation and the accountability and in doing so, limit a large area where risk can fulminate.

August 25, 2015 Posted by | Assisted Living, Home Health, Hospice, Senior Housing, Skilled Nursing | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Demographic Realities of Seniors Housing and Healthcare

As regular readers know, I speak at a number of conferences annually.  Additionally, I work with financiers and investors in the space literally daily.  In all my journeys and conversations, I am still faced with some major myth “debunking” about the nature of the seniors housing and healthcare demand, current.  The major myth: Baby-boomers are either here, impactful, or here soon enough that additional supply and different supply is necessary. Nothing is further from reality.

The economist in me (and the economist that I am) wants desperately to provide a full-blown lecture here but I’ll refrain and provide a Cliff’s Note version.  Demand is a function of supply and to a lesser extent, vice-versa.  The two are interdependent.  Demand (commercial) requires a supply of consumers, able and willing to pay a price for a given product.  Seniors housing and healthcare, especially housing, has a very elastic demand curve.  This means that price is a major influencer in demand. The amount of demand for higher-end, above market seniors housing, is less than the amount of demand for moderate and lower-priced seniors housing (at its core).

Demand is also influenced psychologically hence the “willing” component. Seniors housing requires the consumer to make a psychological decision about moving or consuming, a niche’ product.  This fact is supported by the demographic reality that less than 12% of all seniors live in a specific “seniors housing” environment.  While a greater number reside within a NORC setting (naturally occurring retirement community) such as a condo complex or apartment complex, the reality is that fully 80% of all seniors at anytime, do not reside in seniors housing nor are they “looking”.  The core dilemma with seniors housing is that seniors universally, prefer to live in their “residence” in their community.  Some, but a rather small number, choose or are motivated to move annually by choice or by need – the latter being the greater motivator (death, family move, health issue, change in neighborhood, etc.).

Consumers, in this case seniors, exist along the full spectrum of age and ability (economic) to pay.  Given the elasticity of demand for seniors housing (the higher the price, the fewer number of able consumers) coupled with a plethora of living options for seniors (home, condo, apartment, etc.), measuring the actual demand for seniors housing is a bit more complicated than most want to believe.  The complexity lies demographically and economically.

First, the demographics today are not spectacular.  While it is true that we have more older adults reaching ages 80 plus than at any time in history, the number of people in this cohort as derived by birth is falling.  An individual today aged 80 was born in 1935 – the depression/war years.  During this period (depression/war years), birth rates declined precipitously.  See chart below.

Birth

It isn’t until the post 1945 years and subsequently, into the mid 1950s that birth rates accelerated into what we commonly know as the Baby Boom.  Simple math thus tells us that the real expanse of supply of seniors, age appropriate for seniors housing (around age 80) won’t occur for another 15 years minimally.  Today, we are actually seeing a reduction in overall “age relevant” supplies of seniors for seniors housing.

Back to the point about seniors housing demand being highly elastic.  Fewer consumers (potentially) also means that all consumers by economic status and desire are fewer in number.  The point here is that the supply of seniors for higher-end housing is not just smaller in number  but smaller in “desire” or motivation.  Folks that have the means to spend thousands per month and invest an entry fee of $250,000 to $1,000,000 also have the means to explore multiple different options.  In other words, the range of substitute products (alternatives) for this group is plenty and growing.  They clearly can afford to remain at home longer, acquire supportive services, or migrate to lifestyle communities or other planned communities that include multiple options and services geared towards “aging in place” (see Del Webb and The Villages as examples).

Today, there is a reason many communities and projects continue to struggle with occupancy.  The average nationally remains stuck around 90% and Assisted Living hasn’t broached this level yet – even though projects continue to come forward at a steady clip.  A contributing factor?  The demographics are not as fluid and as strong now as industry folks want to portray.  The industry is in the core openings of the 20th century baby bust.  Additionally, not only is this next group demographically smaller, it is economically less well off, by virtue of time of birth, than the cohort preceding and the one following.  This is in effect, the double demographic dilemma for seniors housing.

The moral of this present story: Supply of units for the most part, in most regions, is good to surplus.  Reinvention in place is what I advise and for growth; acquire – don’t develop.  Adding additional inventory is not only expensive it is difficult to support, except in certain markets where certain really good conditions apply, demographically and economically with proper demand analysis.  This present condition will last for about the next 10 years and to a certain degree, maybe longer as the age at which seniors seek “seniors housing” elongates – moving into the 80s. Developers need to understand this condition and seek proper demand analysis and economic planning before believing the demographics of “If you Build it, They Will Come!”

November 19, 2014 Posted by | Senior Housing | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Leading Age Nashville: Entry Fee Pricing Worksheet

Sorry for the slight delay.  I had hoped to have the file loaded on this site by the end of last week.  Unfortunately, other priorities piled in/up and thus, I am a tad tardy.  The worksheet is clearly marked on the Reports and Other Documents page.  Tabs at the bottom illustrate pricing worksheets for each contract type.  Each sheet has explanatory notes but anyone with questions may contact me directly via a comment to this post (please include an e-mail address for reply) or via e-mail to hislop3@msn.com. Happy Pricing!

 

November 3, 2014 Posted by | Senior Housing | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Leading Age Nashville Materials Uploaded

The  Power Point and pricing spreadsheet are now available on the Reports and Other Documents page.  They are free to download and use as desired.  I am finishing the Entrance Fee pricing spreadsheet and should have it uploaded by the end of the week.  Anyone who needs help or has questions may contact me via comment to this post (please provide a valid e-mail for reply) or directly to me at hislop3@msn.com

 

October 28, 2014 Posted by | Senior Housing | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Leading Age Nashville Materials

First, thanks to all who attended the session this past Monday in Nashville.  I had a great time and really appreciate all the interest and nice comments.  As I mentioned at the conclusion of the session, my pricing worksheet, the presentation plus an entrance fee worksheet that I will develop, will be posted to this site.  The materials will be available by Tuesday, October 28 (if not sooner), on the Reports and Other Documents page of this site.  When posted, they will be free for download and distribution.  Once posted, anyone with questions may contact me through this site via a comment or via e-mail to hislop3@msn.com

I hope to see you all again soon and for sure, in Boston next year!

October 23, 2014 Posted by | Senior Housing | , , | Leave a comment

Leading Age in Nashville

Once again, and in reply to a series of inquiries (those already in and those yet to come in), I will be in Nashville for the Leading Age Annual Conference.  And yes, I am speaking again – Monday, October 20th at 8:15 AM.  The session title is the “Intersection of Pricing and Marketing”.  The title is a bit misleading as the presentation is primarily focused on developing proper pricing strategies for CCRCs – financial, strategic and from a marketing perspective.  As always, the presentation will post on this site shortly after the Conference.  Hope to see everyone in Nashville!

October 6, 2014 Posted by | Senior Housing | , , , | 2 Comments

CCRC Update 2014

Earlier this spring (a couple, three moths ago), I spoke at a marketing/P.R. conference and when my session was over, I sat and visited with a number of the attendees.  My presentation was about value propositions and marketing; how to align your organization’s core economic value components within a marketplace, within a customer segment.  Within the short additional time I spent with these attendees, I learned that a number of their organizations (CCRCs) were still struggling post the recent economic recession/slow-down.  In fact, a number of them expressed that in their areas/region, recovery hadn’t yet begun.

Since that event and over the course of the past three months or so, I took notes on various client engagements, discussions and research reports on how the CCRC industry is fairing these days.  Before I break down my conclusions/observations, some general prefacing comments about the industry are required.  First, the CCRC industry is truly different by location and thus, it is expected that some areas/regions, etc. are faring better than others. Second, established projects have fared differently than newer projects; not always better but different.  Third, the capital structure of a CCRC (how much debt and how the debt is structured in terms of rate, etc.) is a major component of how well or not well, certain projects are doing.

Below are my observations/conclusions of how the CCRC industry is doing mid-way through the third quarter of 2014.  As stated, most of my observations are first-hand (client engagements)* followed by research and conversations with those that work in and around the industry. *(My firm and in many cases me specifically, does capital development/corporate development work within the industry including consultant’s reports when covenant defaults occur, strategic planning, turn-around consultation, M&A work, research for banks and investment banks, and economic, market, and financial feasibility studies.  My comments do not reflect any specific client or series of clients or any engagement former or current).

  • Late 2013/early 2014, Fitch issued their outlook on the CCRC industry as “stable”.  Their conclusion was that improving occupancy rates, stable expenses due to the non-inflationary economy and access to low (historically) cost capital was favorable and thus, their rating.  In general, I concur that where real estate rebounded (used inventory down, prices stable and climbing) and general economic conditions improved (unemployment falling, commercial activity rising, etc.), demand for units returned to near pre-recession levels and occupancy increased.  However, as I mentioned at the beginning of this post, there remains pockets of weakness, some fairly profound, across the country.  The regional/local outlook as opposed to the 20,000 foot national trend is more relevant to the success/struggle of any one project.  For example, our clients in “rust belt, heavy manufacturing” areas in Ohio, Wisconsin, Illinois, West Virginia and New York would mount a stiff argument that the outlook is far from “stable”.
  • Pricing has remained relatively flat and in many areas, occupancy gains have occurred as a result of discounting and promotions.  I don’t see this changing any time soon as while demand is good in some areas, demand is tempered by recent events and still, a large amount of economic uncertainty.  The wealth profile of the current demographic has shifted, especially on the income component.
  • Approximately half of the projects that were in the development queue in 2008 evaporated or re-scaled.  Only recently has the industry returned to a somewhat robust, new development outlook.  Access to continued low-cost capital is a key element of fuel for this emerging (again) trend and even though rates ticked-up in November/December 2013, they have since stabilized.  Rate however, is just one component.  Demand for debt on the part of investors is still at low ebb.  Suppressed yields have moved investors out of fixed rate, tax exempt debt en-masse.  Deals still are competitive but nowhere close to pre-recession levels.  Banks are only now starting to revisit commercial lending to the sector and again, not with the same fervor as pre-2008. The overall number of outlets has declined and the debt to equity levels are still conservative (70/30).  Valuations remain a bit low as comps are still weighted by one-off deals, distress deals and work-outs and bankruptcies.  Book remains the valuation arbiter and as such, cap levels remain in a narrow range.  Overall, the capital outlook is fair but caution and uncertainty remain prevalent and thus, valuations are flat and good deals get done but marginal deals still struggle.
  • Rising occupancy and improving economic conditions have slowed defaults and tempered bankruptcies but not eliminated them.  Again, certain projects in improving economies have rebounded though others in regions/markets of slow to no-recovery languish.  Though average occupancy has once again moved into the low ninetieth percentile across the industry, I still see projects below this level on a regular basis and some, profoundly below.  In virtually all instances when I encounter low occupancy, two elements are present.  First, the market area is struggling economically – real estate, jobs, infrastructure, etc.  Second, the project itself is really viable or relevant.  More on this latter point toward the end.
  • Projects that have done well, rebounded, stayed vibrant exhibit the following key elements, aside from being in a market area that isn’t still declining or not recovering.   First, they were not overly leveraged.  Second, they had/have investments and cash reserves.  Third, they didn’t defer maintenance to any great extent.  Fourth, they stayed relatively lean on the expense side. Fifth, they have diversified revenue streams/bases.  Sixth, their pricing was market balanced and actuarially sound.  Finally, their management was forward-thinking and had plans in place to address the changing environment.  They have a good senses of the economic and market conditions impacting their organization and they plan and address these conditions fluidly.
  • Projects that haven’t fared well exhibit the opposite characteristics from above and/or, they simply exist in market areas that haven’t rebounded.  The most common element of struggling projects that I see is ineffective senior management and governance.  They simply never moved beyond a paradigm that was shifting, shifted and won’t ever return.  They aren’t relevant  and  haven’t learned or developed the current competencies required to compete in a different economic and market environment.  For many, the writing is on the wall and for some, revival is possible but a complete turn-around is required.

What I have concluded over the last few months is that industry success is a function today of five components;

  1. Being in a market area that is economically stable and modestly improving.  Real estate fluidity and price stability is important but equally  important is the general economic outlook, government infrastructure and commercial economy.  Projects that aren’t in this type of environment won’t, no matter what they do, improve beyond a point of mere survival (thriving just isn’t possible).
  2. Marketing and pricing today require a completely different set of competencies and strategies to achieve success.  Pricing must be strategic and financially validated and demonstrative of a clear value proposition.  No longer can a project succeed on guessing, market comparables and eyeballing what “management thinks” the budget will support. Marketing is different as well.  This is no longer a real estate driven sale and the economic axiom of elastic demand applies.  CCRCs have a very elastic demand curve and such, pricing and marketing must unite in the creation and communication of the economic value proposition.  More leads than ever are required to generate sales and build and hold, market share.  Traditional print and media ads won’t get it done.
  3. A highly diverse revenue stream/platform (multiple service lines) such that liquidity and debt service covenants can comfortably be made within normative occupancy levels (90th percentile or lower is best). If this is the case, the CCRC also tends to be more market competitive and capable of self-referral and internal market development.  In other words, it has multiple channels for referral development.
  4. Strong, capable management/leadership that isn’t necessarily, tied to the industry conventional wisdom.  They are adept at planning, forecasting, and keeping operations structured on high-quality, efficient service delivery.  They know the market, know their place in it, know the economic outlooks and demand elements and adjust their products accordingly.
  5. A relevant physical plant environment for the market.  A project doesn’t have to be new and/or the most glitzy.  It does have to fit the market however and be current – minimal to no deferred maintenance.  Economic value proposition are about proper product value, inclusive of warranty, for the customer to evaluate the tangible and intangible relevance.  The physical real estate elements are a major component of the proposition and properly positioned within the overall project, priced and communicated correctly, the prospects for sales and success are high.

August 15, 2014 Posted by | Senior Housing | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Boards of Directors: Success, Mediocrity and Sometimes, Failure

As a follow-up to a recent post on Boards of Directors and corporate governance (http://wp.me/ptUlY-gq), this post addresses how boards promote success, can often drive mediocrity and in some cases prompt organizational failure.  The take-away where success, mediocrity and failure occur isn’t structure, terms or committees rather, a consistent excellence or break-down in terms of structural clarity, roles, and organizational focus.  Governance which exists, regardless of the framework, to enhance and perpetuate corporate/organizational value, reputational integrity, and shareholder/stakeholder security and return is the foundation for success.

If there is a single condition more preeminent than another that drives mediocrity and failure for a board it is conflict of interest.  This condition is not unique to non-profits or for-profits but in my history, I encounter it more frequently in non-profits, likely due to the inherent lack of compensation available for directors.  The non or limited compensation component in non-profits is more ripe for a “quid pro quo” reward structure in which, the director is a de facto player in the organization’s business via a vendor relationship of some sort.  Even in the best of circumstances, the vendor representative on the board scenario defeats the concept of independence producing an air of duplicity and insider dealing.  If judgment is clouded, opinions suppressed or decisions focused on the inter-relationships among directors and the entity beyond the absolute best interest of the organization, governance cannot be optimal.

Effective governance requires independence and to the greatest extent possible, a board level series of tests and policies that promote independence and police conflict.  Below are the common tools I find most helpful in achieving and maintaining independence.

  • Recruitment of individuals that are unrelated in any regard, to the organization (not vendors, no familial employment, no familial relationships, etc.).
  • Policies that require annual disclosure of employment, board memberships for the director and director’s family, investments where applicable, etc.  This is to insure that directors don’t have relationships, ownership, investments that mask independence.  Note: Disclosure is not enough as once disclosed, remedy becomes the key.
  • An annual review of major vendor relationships such that the same is given to each director as part of his/her annual disclosure.  If a director is anything more than a passive investor in a vendor relationship, the director is no longer truly independent.
  • In healthcare organizations, annual background checks with the OIG, licensing boards (where applicable, DEA (where applicable), and criminal checks are warranted.
  • Policies that require reviews concurrent with major capital purchases, capital projects, mergers/acquisitions, etc. to assure that independence remains among the board.

The element second in importance to independence at the board level is role clarity and policies and organizational structure that clearly delineates the role of the board, the duties of directors, and the key performance elements for the board.  Again, these pieces lacking is a certainty for organizational mediocrity and/or, potential failure.  A board’s primary objective is to assure the viability, health and well-being of the organizational entity.  In this realm, its role is clear.  Where I have seen boards struggle and thus the organization, is when a lack of this clarity exists.  Below is my top seven item list that identifies where boards can assure role clarity for the board and each director.

  • The Board must have a job description or functional description and should each director.
  • Shareholders (and for non-profits, stakeholders) must be identified (not individually necessarily).  This element is where I see non-profits struggle mightily.  For example, for a non-profit CCRC shareholders/stakeholders are not residents.  Residents are customers, even in entry-fee communities.  Shareholder/stakeholders are for certain, any holder of public debt and any holder of mortgage paper.  Major vendors and insurers are stakeholders as well.  The definitional clarity begins at the “organizational level” in terms of where lies, for a board, the duty to assure organizational stability, reputational solidity and organizational viability and financial fluidity.  Yes, customers such as residents are tangentially impacted when things aren’t well-off but truth be examined, a debt failure causes irreparable harm to residents if a board isn’t engaged in securitizing organization viability.
  • A formal function, policy, etc. for board performance review and director performance review.
  • A formal function and structure at the board level for long-term planning – financial, strategic, etc.
  • A plan at the board level for CEO review, retention and succession.
  • A formal function for board development and education.
  • A communication element for discussions/feedback from/with shareholders/stakeholders.

Returning to the title: Success at the governance and thus, organizational performance level is when the board is truly committed and has put into place, the structural elements necessary to fulfill the boards primary duties;

  • Assure independence.
  • Focus on the financial, reputational and legal risks and the securitization thereto, of the organization.
  • Plan for and understand, the environment in which, the organization operates.
  • Assure plans for operating in this environment meet and exceed, the requirements in the second bullet above.
  • Understand and have policies and procedures in place, that clearly delineate the role of the board from that of management.  Maintain a fertile environment for a qualified CEO to garner appropriate feedback, support, reward, and security.  Boards need to assure, for the organization’s viability, retention of high-performing leadership and the succession thereof.
  • Be open and literally virtual, to shareholders/stakeholders.

When I encounter mediocrity and unfortunately, failure or the likelihood of failure, I see the same set of issues repeatedly.  As before, I have seen these most often among non-profits but not exclusively.

  • Lack of independence for directors.  In some circumstances, the conflict of interest is so clear (directors in high-level, influential posts with major vendors) and in some cases, subtle where familial relationship are involved.  Suffice to say, in non-profits this is one is the most prevalent.
  • Involved or have a tendency to become involved in operational issues.  This element is perilous in so many ways.  First, the board exists to function separate and distinct from management.  A board’s job is to procure and secure, competent capable management not to dabble in operations.  If management is underperforming, it is the board’s duty to identify the performance gaps and to assist management in achieving correction but not by becoming involved in operations.  Likewise, boards that find the need to meddle don’t empower management to take risks, drive performance and seek innovation.  Think about it: The presence of board members in operations creates sufficient tension for management and thus, management tends to guard what it does and how it does it.
  • Insufficient knowledge for the industry that the board operates within.  Boards need education sufficient to understand the key risks, shareholder interests, etc. in the applicable industry.  Uneducated boards equal poor decisions.
  • Lack of knowledge and engagement with stakeholders and shareholders.  Remember, this is a key issue even for non-profits. My non-profit clients goof this one all the time.  They believe that the shareholder/stakeholder is whomever they are serving (patients, residents, etc.) and thus, they lose sight of where the organizational risks and commitments (legal and other) truly lie.  Boards engage shareholders and stakeholders, management engages customers.  I can literally write dozens of pages of case studies where boards, especially non-profits, lost sight of (or never had in sight), the actual stakeholder/shareholder and ultimately, what happened and how painful it was.
  • Lack of a risk management structure at the board level.
  • Lack of a process and commitment to strategic and financial planning.
  • No or a deficient process for board recruitment, review and performance measurement.

In the final installment of this three-part series, I’ll cover best-practices for governance, specifically in the healthcare/post-acute care/seniors housing environment.  In so doing, I’ll cover the issues such that regardless of tax status (exempt or taxable), the information is relevant.

 

 

 

April 8, 2014 Posted by | Assisted Living, Home Health, Hospice, Senior Housing, Skilled Nursing | , , , , , , | Leave a comment