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Senior and Post-Acute Healthcare News and Topics

SNF Final Rule 2019: Key Points and Provisions

Beginning yesterday, I’ve been following the news regarding CMS’ annual issuance of Final PPS rules for providers.  Of greatest interest is the SNF Final Rule as it includes a completely new payment system, departing from the RUGS IV, therapy-centric system currently in-place.  I’ve read through the Final Rule (all 424 mind-numbing pages) and summarized what SNFs need to know right now. I will undoubtedly expand upon the PDPM model as more is known and I’ve modeled claims via provider experience data.

RATE: The Final Rule includes a 2.4% increase to SNFs via adjustments to the RUGS IV categories/CMIs.  NOTE:  Providers that have not met their QRP (Quality Reporting) requirements/data submissions will receive a .04% increase – net of the 2% penalty.

SNF QRP: There were no changes made to the SNF QRPs in this rule.  The Claims-Based Measures of, 1) Community/Post-Acute discharge; 2) Preventable re-hospitalizations (30 days post discharge), and; 3) Spending per Medicare beneficiary (SNF) remain.  The Assessment-Based Measures of , 1) Falls with injury; 2) New or worsening pressure injuries post-admission, and; 3) Percent of patients with functional admission and discharge assessments and care plans.  CMS did indicate that it will adopt a “burden” or return on investment test for adoption or removal of future measures.

SNF VBP: The impact of Value-Based Purchasing begins Oct. 1, 2018. This incorporates an incentive payment or penalty reduction for the lone applicable quality measure: 30 day re-hospitalization rates post SNF discharge.  The Final Rule includes notably, an extraordinary circumstances exception policy plus discussion on future baseline periods for measurement, scoring changes, etc.

PDPM: This new payment system (Patient Driven Payment Model) is set to go into effect on October 1, 2019 (FY 2020). It will replace the RUGS IV system.  It is case-mix driven, utilizing the MDS assessment tool to categorize resident care needs via five case-mix categories: Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Nursing, and Non-Therapy Ancillary requirements.  The base non-clinical case-mix category remains which captures the room and board and capital costs for SNFs (technical stuff here so no need for detail). As part of PDPM, only three assessments (MDS) are needed/required. The first is correlated to admission, the second to discharge and the third is related to change in condition/change in need.  Payment, regardless of service utilization, is assessment driven via each case-mix category.  Also gone from this system is any intensity measure of therapy services (no minute requirements or frequency). Added to the therapy requirements is a provision that as much as 25% (aggregate) of therapy treatment time can be group or concurrent.  Based on data provided, the unadjusted Federal Urban PDPM rate (10/1/2019) would be $410.85 (before labor/wage adjustments). The Unadjusted Rural PDPM rate would be $425.37.

As in the Proposed Rule, PDPM incorporates a variable rate concept.  The Final Rule maintained this concept unaltered.  After day 20, rates begin to decline at a pace equal to 2% every 7 days, starting at day 21.  The decline correlates to reductions in PT and OT rates (.03 per day) and a reduction in NTA (Non-Therapy Ancillary).  More below on Non-Therapy Ancillary inclusions.

Under PDPM, residents are classified/coded via ICD 10 into one (only one) of ten clinical categories corresponding to the primary reason for the inpatient stay. CMS intends to map ICD-10 codes into the clinical categories for providers.

  1. Major Joint Replacement or Spinal Surgery
  2. Cancer
  3. Non-Surgical Orthopedic/Musculoskeletal
  4. Pulmonary
  5. Orthopedic (that doesn’t fall into #1)
  6. Cardiovascular and Coagulations
  7. Acute Infections
  8. Acute Neurologic
  9. Medical Management
  10. Non-Orthopedic Surgery

To accommodate higher-cost, sicker patients in the SNF setting, PDPM implements a Non-Therapy Ancillary case-mix. The NTA categories are below.  Other than the first category of HIV/AIDS, each NTA is picked-up from a corresponding MDS item. Sorry for the length but I think the list is informative for providers.

HIV/AIDS 

Parenteral IV Feeding: Level High

Special Treatments/Programs: Intravenous Medication Post-admit

Special Treatments/Programs: Ventilator or Respirator Post-admit

Parenteral IV feeding: Level Low

Lung Transplant Status

Special Treatments/Programs: Transfusion Post-admit

Major Organ Transplant Status, Except Lung

Active Diagnoses: Multiple Sclerosis Code

Opportunistic Infections

Active Diagnoses: Asthma COPD Chronic Lung Disease Code

Bone/Joint/Muscle Infections/Necrosis – Except Aseptic Necrosis of Bone

Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

Wound Infection

Active Diagnoses: Diabetes Mellitus (DM)

Endocarditis

Immune Disorders

End-Stage Liver Disease

Other Foot Skin Problems: Diabetic Foot Ulcer

Narcolepsy and Cataplexy

Cystic Fibrosis

Special Treatments/Programs: Tracheostomy Care Post-admit

Active Diagnoses: Multi-Drug Resistant Organism (MDRO)

Special Treatments/Programs: Isolation Post-admit

Specified Hereditary Metabolic/Immune Disorders

Morbid Obesity

Special Treatments/Programs: Radiation Post-admit

Highest Stage of Unhealed Pressure Ulcer – Stage 4

Psoriatic Arthropathy and Systemic Sclerosis

Chronic Pancreatitis

Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy and Vitreous Hemorrhage

Other Foot Skin Problems: Foot Infection Code, Other Open Lesion on Foot

Complications of Specified Implanted Device or Graft

Bladder and Bowel Appliances: Intermittent Catheterization

Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Aseptic Necrosis of Bone

Special Treatments/Programs: Suctioning Post-admit

Cardio-Respiratory Failure and Shock

Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Myelofibrosis

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Other Connective Tissue Disorders, and Inflammatory Spondylopathies

Diabetic Retinopathy – Except Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy and Vitreous Hemorrhage

Nutritional Approaches While a Resident: Feeding Tube

Severe Skin Burn or Condition

Intractable Epilepsy

Active Diagnoses: Malnutrition

Disorders of Immunity – Except : RxCC97: Immune Disorders

Cirrhosis of Liver 

Bladder and Bowel Appliances: Ostomy

Respiratory Arrest

Pulmonary Fibrosis and Other Chronic Lung Disorders

Summary: Ten clinical categories essentially begin the coding process (reason for admit).  From this point, each case-mix category is developed (PT, OT, SLP, Nursing and NTA). This is done via the admission MDS.  The rate is constant for days 1-20 of the stay.  Beginning on day 21, the rate reduces equal to 2% every additional 7 days.  A change of condition MDS can occur, altering the rate variability (reduction) by change in patient need.  One more assessment (MDS) is completed to recap the stay at discharge and capture QRP data.  In the meantime, stay tuned for additional information and strategic tips on how to prepare for PDPM and what specifically, to know in interpreting the “best path/best-practices” at the facility level.

 

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August 1, 2018 Posted by | Skilled Nursing | , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

CMS Final SNF PPS Rule for 2019: Increases plus PDPM

Late this afternoon, I caught news that CMS will release a number of Final Rules impacting post-acute providers over the next few days.  Below is a quick summary of what is known for SNFs.  I will update this information as I get access to the Final Rule.

  • PPS rates (manual) to adjust by 2.4% (increase).
  • A final version of PDPM is included in the Final Rule.  Implementation steps including dates won’t be known until the Final Rule is issued and likely, there will still be some “fill-in-the-blanks” that will be later developed and issued. The good news is that the assessment and documentation changes that were part of the PDPM proposal remain.
  • There will be some quality measure changes forthcoming as CMS’ Meaningful Measure Initiative is tasked with weighing cost vs. benefit across provider measures.  It will be some time however, before it is clear which measure changes will occur and the impact.  Important to know: Changes in meaningful measures impact QRP and ultimately, Value Based Purchasing/Pay for Performance for providers.  It is important that SNFs pay close attention to these measures as their use is beyond reporting; now reimbursement correlated and compliance correlated as well (new survey process is very similar in many ways to QIS – data driven).

More information on this topic once the Final Rule is public.

July 31, 2018 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Interoperability and Post-Acute Implications

I’m not sure how many of my readers are following the subject and CMS stance/policy on interoperability among providers but the concepts and resultant debate are rather interesting.  I am trying to encourage as many clients and readers to tune-in on this subject as the implications are sweeping – positively and negatively.

Interoperability in this context means the ability of computer systems or software to exchange and/or make use of information for functional purposes.  In health care, the genesis of the interoperability concept began with HIPAA in the nineties.  HIPAA spawned the HITECH Act in 2009 which ultimately created Meaningful Use.  For anyone unfamiliar with Meaning Use and its incentive provisions, think no further than Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) and quality reporting.  The IMPACT Act is an analogous outgrowth of blended concepts between Meaningful Use, Value-Based Purchasing and Interoperability.  Conceptually, the goal is to create data measures that have “meaning” in terms of clinical conditions, outcomes, patient care and economics.  Ideally, data that matters and can be shared will improve outcomes, improve standardization of care and treatment processes and reduce cost through reduced waste and duplication.  Sounds simple and logical enough.

In April of this year, with the roll-out of various provider segment Inpatient PPS proposed rules for FY 2019, CMS included proposals to strengthen and expedite, interoperability.  The concept is contained within the SNF and Hospital proposed rules.  The twist however, is that CMS is changing its tone from “voluntary” to “mandatory” regarding expediting or advancing, interoperability. Up until this point, Meaningful Use projects that advanced interoperability goals were incentive driven; no punishment.  Among the options CMS is willing to pursue to advance interoperability are new Conditions of Participation and Conditions for Coverage that may include reimbursement implications (negative) and fines for non-compliance and non-advancement.  In the SNF 2019 Proposed Rule, providers are mandated to use the 2015 Edition of Certified Health Record/Information Technology in order to qualify for incentive payments under VBP and avoid reimbursement reduction(s).  For those interested, the 2015 Certified EHR Technology requirement summary is available here: final2015certedfactsheet.022114

The possible implications for providers are numerous – positive and negative.  The greatest positive implication is a (hopeful) rapid escalation of software systems that can share functional data directly without having to build and maintain separate interfaces (third-party).  Likewise, the proposed regulations will facilitate faster development of Health Information Exchanges (HIEs).  Many states have operating HIEs but provider participation and investment has been limited.  A quick interoperability interchange is via an HIE versus separate, unique data and software platform integration.  As SNFs and HHAs have MDS and OASIS assessment requirements on admission, fluid patient history, diagnoses/coding exchange and treatment history will facilitate faster and more accurate, MDS/OASIS completion – a real winner. Dozens of other “tasky” issues can be addressed as well such as portions of drug reconciliation requirements by diagnosis on admission, review of lab and other diagnostic results, order interchanges and interfaces, etc.

The most negative implication for providers is COST.  In reality, the post-acute side of health care isn’t really data savvy and hasn’t really kept pace with software and technology developments.  Many providers are small.  Many providers are rural. Many providers maintain primarily paper records and use technology only minimally.  Full EHR for them is impractical and with present reimbursement levels, unlikely any time soon.  The second most negative implication for providers is the fragmentation that exists among the system developers and software companies in the health care industry.  The “deemed” proprietary nature of systems and their software codes has limited collaboration and cooperation necessary to advance interoperability. HIEs were supposed to remedy this problem but alas, not yet and not at the magnitude-level CMS is foretelling within its Proposed Rules.

Interoperability is needed and amazing, conceptually.  The return is significant in terms of improvements in outcomes and reductions in waste and cost.  Unfortunately, the provider community remains too fragmented and inversely incentivized today to jump ahead faster (money not tied to integration and initiatives among providers).  Software systems don’t work between providers in fashions that support the interoperability goals.  More troubling: the economics are daunting for providers that are not seeing any additional dollars in their reimbursements, capable of supporting the capital and infrastructure needs part and parcel to additional (and faster), interoperability.

 

June 27, 2018 Posted by | Home Health, Policy and Politics - Federal, Skilled Nursing | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

SNFs and PBJ Article

Attached is a link a to a good PBJ (payroll based journal) article.  It covers the basic concepts of what is going on today with regard to staffing level reporting and the Five Star system.  Recall, staffing as a domain, is one of the stars in this system.  The article is posted here (re-published) with permission of the original publication.  Enjoy!

Excerpt_S3_BALTC_0618

June 13, 2018 Posted by | Skilled Nursing | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

CMS Proposes Reintroduction of Pre-Payment Review for Home Health (with a twist)

In a memo set for release today, CMS is proposing to reintroduce pre-payment review (with a twist) for Home Health claims.  The memo version is here: HHA Pre Payment Recall, CMS first introduced pre-payment review in August 2016, starting in Illinois.  The process required agencies to submit claim-related data BEFORE receiving final payment or face an adjustment in their payment of minus 25%.  This reduction could not be appealed. Providers could resubmit additional data to achieve full affirmation of their claim PRIOR to submitting final billing for the claim.  After a certain threshold of claims was reviewed and determined proper, the pre-payment process would sunset for the agency.

The initial trial that began in Illinois was such a debacle for agencies and the industry due to the time delays and criterion laxity, slowing cash flow and increasing administrative burden that Congress finally stepped in and put the program on hiatus.  The Illinois experiment was so initially bad that further expansion to other states (Florida was next), never occurred.

In this new proposal which will open for comment (60 days) after publication in the Federal Register, CMS is keeping the program design constant with a couple of twists.

  1. Providers/Agencies in the demonstration states of Illinois, Ohio, Florida, North Carolina, and Texas will be able to choose whether to submit data to the MAC (Medicare Administrative Contractor) for review on a pre-claim or post-claim/payment basis.
  2. Providers/Agencies may opt-out of the payment review (pre or post) by accepting payments at a discounted rate – minus 25%.

As with the former program, providers/agencies will need to meet an acceptable level of affirmed claim submissions (pre or post) to move to an episodic review standard.  In effect, after the agency has been subject to sufficient claim reviews and found to be compliant with required documentation and billing standards, the agency transitions to an “every so often” sampling of claims.  As before, providers that fail to submit data or elect pre or post payment reviews will see claim payments automatically discounted by 25%.

The rationale from CMS to return to this review process is the same as before; assurance of claim accuracy and fraud reduction.  CMS continues to believe that HHAs are sloppy and negligent enough in their claims process that improper payments are too high (as a percent of all claims) and or fraud, still prevalent enough to warrant a program of systematic review. Of course, as of now, CMS can offer no assurance that the next incarnation of claim reviews will go smoother than the 2016 experience.  The belief is that lessons were learned and steps put in-place by the MAC to smooth out reviews and not harm agency financial status or create undue additional burden.  Frankly, I hold no such expectation or belief that the process will be markedly better.

May 31, 2018 Posted by | Home Health | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

CMS Proposes New SNF Payment Model

Last Friday, CMS released the contents of its annual proposed rule updating the SNF PPS plus (as always), fine tuning certain related programmatic elements. Final Federal Register Publication is set for May 8.  (Anyone wishing the PDF version may download it from the Reports and Other Documents page on this site or access it here SNF Proposed Rule 4 2018 ).  The most watched information for providers is the proposed rate adjustment though lately, for the post-acute segments of health care, other elements pertaining to payment model changes have eclipsed rate “watching”.

Last year’s proposed rule for the SNF PPS contained the release of RCS-1.  After extensive commentary, CMS pulled back RCS-1, shelving it for some conceptual remake.  We now, as of Friday, know the remake – PDPM for short (Patient Driven Payment Model). As with all yearly releases similar, a comment period has begun, lasting until (if not otherwise extended) the last week of June (June 26).

PDPM as proposed, is designed to replace the current SNF payment methodology known as RUGs IV.  Unless date changes, etc. are made by CMS post commentary review, the effective date of the change (from RUGs to PDPM) is 10/1/19 (next October).   PDPM as an outgrowth of RCS-1 and received commentary, is a simplified payment model designed to be more holistic in patient assessment, capture more clinical complexity, eliminate or greatly reduce the therapy focus by eliminating the minute levels for categorization, and simplifying via reduction, the assessment process and schedule (reduced to three possible assessments/MDS tasks). Below is a summary of PDPM core attributes/features as proposed.  On this site in the Reports and Other Documents page is the PDPM Calculation Worksheet that provides additional details beyond the reference points below PDPM Calculation for SNFs.

  • PDPM uses five, case-mix adjusted components for classification and thus, payment: PT, OT, Speech, Non-Therapy Ancillary and Nursing.
  • For each of these components, there are separate groups which a resident may be assigned, based on MDS data.  For example, there are 16 PT groups, 16 OT groups, 12 Speech groups, 6 Non-Therapy Ancillary groups and 25 Nursing groups.
  • Each resident, by assessment, is classified into one of the group elements within the component categories. This means that every resident falls into a group within the five case-mix components of PT. OT, Speech, Non-Therapy Ancillary and Nursing.
  • Each separate case-mix component has its own case-mix adjusted indexes and corresponding per diem rates.
  • Three of the components, PT, OT and Non-Therapy Ancillary have variable per diem features that allow for changes in rates due to changing patient needs during the course of the stay.
  • The full per diem rate is calculated by adding the PT, OT, and Non-Therapy Ancillary rates (variable) to the non-adjusting or non-variable Nursing and Speech components.
  • Therapy utilization may include group and/or concurrent treatment sessions provided no more than 25% of the total therapy utilization (by minutes) is classified as group or concurrent.
  • PT, OT, and Speech classification by group within their respective components do not include any function of “time”.  The sole denominator of how much/little therapy a resident receives is the necessity determined by the assessment process and by the clinical judgment of the care team.  In this regard, the minimum and maximum levels are based on resident need not on a predetermined category (RUG level).
  • Diagnoses codes from the hospital on admission (via ICD-10) are important and accuracy on the initial MDS (admission) are imperative.
  • Functional measures for Therapy (PT, OT) are derived from Section GG vs. Section G as provided via RCS-1.
  • The Non-Therapy Ancillary component allows facilities to capture additional acuity elements and thus payment, for additional existing comorbidities (e.g., pressure ulcers, COPD, morbid obesity, etc. ) plus a modifier for Parenteral/IV feeding.
  • There are only three Medicare/payment assessments (MDS) required or predicated starting in October of 2019 – admission, change of condition/payment adjustment and discharge. NOTE: All other required MDS submissions for other purposes such as QRP, VBP, Quarterly, etc. remain unchanged.

For SNFs, the takeaways are pretty straight-forward. First, clinical complexity appears to be the focus of increased payment opportunity.  Second, therapies are going to change and fairly dramatic as utilization does not involved minutes and more is better, when clinically appropriate but less is always relevant (if that makes sense).  The paperwork via MDS submissions is definitely less but assessment performance in terms of accuracy and clinical judgment is increased.   MDS Coordinators, those that are exceptional clinicians and can educate and drive a team of clinicians, will be prized as never before.  RUG style categorization is over so the focus is not on maximizing certain types of care and thus payment but on being clinically savvy, delivering high quality and being efficient.  The latter is what I have been preaching now for years.  Those SNFs that have been trending in this direction, caring for clinically complex patients, not shunning the use and embrace of nursing RUGs, and being on the ball in terms of their assessments and QMs are likely to see some real benefits via the PDPM system.

More on this new payment model and strategies to move forward will be in upcoming posts.

May 1, 2018 Posted by | Policy and Politics - Federal, Skilled Nursing, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Upcoming Webinar: Reduce Citation Risk

SNFs are just a little past one year since the new Conditions of Participation were implemented along with a new survey process.  Today, we are in the first-full quarter of Phase 2 implementation and facilities are just now getting surveyed on these requirements. As a result, we have some data on how the new survey process is going, what facilities are experiencing in terms of citations, how survey teams are looking at Phase 2 requirements, etc.

On Wednesday, March 7th I will be joined by Diane R. Hislop, RN, H2 Healthcare’s compliance expert and Senior Partner, presenting a webinar on the Phase 2 aspects of the SNF Conditions of Participation, the new survey process and how facilities can reduce citation risk.  The webinar will last an hour and there are some great handouts and tools that Diane has agreed to share with all participants.  I hope you can join me and Diane for what will be, an exceptionally informative update on SNF surveys and compliance trends.

The registration link is here:

http://hcmarketplace.com/reduce-citation-risk

February 14, 2018 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Presentation Materials from LeadingAge New Orleans

For those of you that could not attend, I have attached the presentation and handouts/tools from our session on Care Coordination.  In addition to the Power Point (last attachment), there are a number of documents including (but not limited to), clinical pathways, careplans, patient education materials, etc.  Anyone with questions on any of these materials, please contact me at hislop3@msn.com or via comment to this post.

Week Care Coordination Rounds Weekly Progress Note

Weekly Cardiac Assessment (2)

Living with Chronic lung disease

Pulmonary pathway

Knee Arthroplasty pathway

Hip Arthroplasty pathway

Energy Conservation

Decision for Ortho Surgery

Care Coordination Journey

Clinical Pathyways

Cardiac pathway

Care Coordination Updated

 

November 6, 2017 Posted by | Policy and Politics - Federal, Skilled Nursing | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

New Compliance/Survey Resource for SNFs

It is rare that I push or endorse any product on this site.  This is an exception worth making.

http://hcmarketplace.com/survey-success-for-long-term-care

The book is authored by my wife who also heads the Clinical Compliance practice within H2 Healthcare, LLC – the firm that I head.  She is our Senior Partner as well as the firm’s Chief Operating Officer.  Honestly, no one knows more about compliance from an operations perspective, in the post-acute industry, particularly SNFs, Hospice, Assisted Living, etc. than she does.

What makes this book a “must have” are the resources and tools contained, in one place.  She has shared a wealth of resources accumulated over her decades of practice, updated and put to use daily with clients, in her work.  For SNFs today, survey and compliance are linked and as so many of you have heard (or read) from me, the single most important aspect in obtaining quality-mix, keeping premium payments low on insurance packages, attaining favorable borrowing terms and eliminating unwarranted fines and forfeitures while having in-place, a de facto risk management and fraud prevention program is best-practice, clinical compliance.  This book will help a facility get there and stay survey ready; and clinically compliant.

This is a unique and worthy work as providers can gain first-hand insights on compliance and survey readiness from an expert who has led more deficiency free surveys, overturned more fines and forfeitures at the appeal and IDR level, and saved more clients and facilities untold millions of dollars in fines and forfeitures than perhaps, any other consultant and executive in the country.  I know, the word “biased” will come to mind but in this case, the work product will speak for itself.

September 22, 2017 Posted by | Policy and Politics - Federal, Skilled Nursing | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Hospice, Hospital Readmissions and Penalty Implications

Late yesterday, a reader (who also happens to be a client from time to time), posed this question to me. “When hospitals discharge to hospice and if the hospice has to readmit to the hospital, the hospital doesn’t get penalized for the readmit?  Is this true?”  Since this question is not one that I have been asked, to my recollection, ever before my guess is that others may have a similar query or interest.  My answer to him/the question, follows.

The short answer is that the readmission penalty issue is not applicable for a hospice to acute hospital transfer/admission.  There is one single caveat that must be present, however: The patient in question must be on the Medicare Hospice benefit rather than traditional Part A and receiving services under some other Hospice offered program such as a Palliative Care program (a home health care style offering).  Below is the reason and regulatory/legal construct why the readmission penalty is not applicable.

  • When a patient elects and is qualified under the Medicare Hospice benefit, the patient opts (effectively) out of his/her traditional Medicare benefit structure – including the assumed coverage for inpatient hospital coverage offered under Medicare Part A.
  • The issue or applicability for readmission penalties for hospitals is only under traditional Medicare fee-for-service or qualified Medicare Advantage plans  It is also only applicable to certain originating DRGs (not all readmissions qualify for a penalty).
  • When a patient enrolls in the Medicare Hospice benefit, the assumptive relationship under Medicare with regard to the patient and his/her provider relationship changes.  The assumption becomes that the patient is effectively, now the “property” (bad word choice but illustrative nonetheless) of the Hospice.  This is so much so that no patient can receive the Hospice benefit under Medicare without becoming a patient of a qualified, certified Hospice provider. Unlike the relationship under traditional or managed Medicare, the patient care is thus the property and coordinated responsibility of the Hospice.  Prior to enrollment, the patient had no connective relationship to any provider – free (for the most part) to seek care from any qualified provider (Med Advantage networks notwithstanding).
  • By his/her enrollment in the Hospice benefit with a Hospice, the patient agrees to a set of covered benefits tied to his/her end-of-life care needs.  He/she also elects to have his/her care effectively provided by or through the Hospice exclusively.  In fact, the patient can’t really show-up at a hospital for an admission and expect to be admitted, without the approval of the Hospice.  The only option a patient has to receive care in this fashion is to “opt out” of the Hospice benefit.
  • Once a patient is enrolled in Hospice, there effectively is no “hospital” benefit left.  The use of a hospital by a Hospice patient is through the Hospice exclusively and any hospital or inpatient use is (only) technically via a GIP or other contracted event/need.  In fact, the hospital has no DRG or admission code nor records the GIP stay as a “hospital” admission.  It (the hospital) can’t create a bill to Medicare for this event and must seek all payment through the Hospice.  As no bill is generated to Medicare Part A with a corresponding DRG and billing code, no inpatient admission occurred and thus, no readmission occurs either applicable (or not) for a penalty.

Like most things Medicare, you won’t find a succinct “memo” to this effect.  Instead, you have to know and go through the detail on the program benefit side and understand how billing, coding and benefit eligibility/program payments work for each provider segment.

 

April 20, 2017 Posted by | Hospice | , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments