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Senior and Post-Acute Healthcare News and Topics

PDPM Webinar: Last Call

Tomorrow, Dean Freeland, PT and I are hosting/conducting a webinar on PDPM and Therapy Contracts.  Dean’s a partner of mine so the event/production will give all participants a chance to learn and get the latest tips and strategies on Medicare’s new payment system for SNFs from two perspectives; therapy and overall policy and operations.  Don’t miss this one as it will be interesting, informative and fun!

Register here: http://hcmarketplace.com/pdpm-therapy-contracts

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February 5, 2019 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Governance and PDPM: What Boards Need to Know

I spend a good (ok, large) amount of time working with non-profit and privately held health care, post-acute and seniors housing organizations.  Nearly all of my work is at the C-level and above and frankly, my career as an executive was there as well (25 plus years).  Boards/governance bodies play a key role in the success and/or failure of an organization.  The same also mitigate or increase risk to the organization, depending on their behavior.   I have witnessed bad boards absolutely devastate once great, market dominant organizations simply through their failure to stay structurally in-tune with industry trends, market conditions, public policy, and patient care and service requirements (from compliance to outcomes and satisfaction).  Naïve, insular and narrowly focused Boards have taken down some of the largest and most prominent companies in any industry.  Health care, with its unique ties to government programs (Medicare, Medicaid, etc.) and regulatory structures, requires a governance model that reflects the industry challenges and mitigates the risks inherent in regulated, reimbursed health care.

Boards have as their primary duty, a fiduciary obligation to the organization.  This duty is best described as an obligation to act and behave solely, in the best interest of the organization and its shareholders/stakeholders.  In non-profit parlance: best interest in the mission of the organization.  To be an effective fiduciary then, the Board must seek to eliminate conflicts of interest and to learn about the risks or potential harms that are inherent to the organization via the business it is in.  The common definitions associated with a Board’s fiduciary obligation is the duty of care, the duty of loyalty and the duty of obedience.  Simply,

  • Duty of Care:  To act as a prudent person and to be engaged in their duties as Board members in the preservation and protection of the organization.  The actions include attending meetings, reading, questioning, and obtaining industry education
  • Duty of Loyalty: Removing self promotion and personal interest (including personal business interest) from Board duties/responsibilities.  Acting only in the collective best interest or the organization and its mission/shareholder/stakeholders.
  • Duty of Obedience: To assure the organization is compliant with all federal, state and local laws and is conducting business in a compliant manner with other rules and regulations as applicable (e.g., bond/debt  covenants).

With PDPM about to change the entire Medicare fee-for-service reimbursement program for SNFs while presenting broader payment change implications (down the road) for Medicare Advantage and even Medicaid (note that Medicaid payment systems always trend-off Medicare programs), Boards need to start NOW to understand PDPM and its certain, organizational impacts.  Each of the above “duties” are in-play but most acutely, the duty of care and the duty of obedience.

To maintain clarity and a certain amount of brevity and readability, below is my Board education/implementation framework for PDPM.

  1. What is PDPM? Explain at a macro-level what the new program impacts (Medicare A, fee-for-service) and how it works compared to the current Medicare RUGs-based system.  I would avoid the jargon and technical while sticking to the core differences.
    • Differences in patient classification and payment level assignment
    • Differences in the role of therapy and the payment thereof
    • Variable payment differences
    • Clinical incentives and behavioral changes
  2. PDPM Impact for the Organization, Part 1? What should the Board know about how PDPM will impact the organization.
    • Revenue impact?  The Board should see and understand, quantified revenue impacts.  Note: Organizations should be modeling the changes NOW to their reimbursement
    • Any technology changes and investments that are necessary prior to October 1
    • Any staff changes, staff education costs, need to budget for consultants, etc.
    • Changes in therapy contracts or therapy provision necessitated by PDPM
    • Changes in care delivery and why such as more group and concurrent therapy, shorter lengths of stay, possible change in clinical acuity
  3. PDPM Impact for the Organization, Part 2? What the Board should know that doesn’t change under PDPM?
    • No changes to other payer sources and programs expected (e.g., Medicare Advantage)
    • No compliance or regulatory changes (survey regulations)
    • No other program changes such as QRP, VBP, etc.
    • No impact to other services or programs the organization may have (home health, hospice, Assisted Living, Pace, etc.)
  4. PDPM Risks: What to Monitor? The Board needs to assure that the organization’s preparation for PDPM and the changes will be implemented and managed such that the organization will stay compliant with all applicable laws, rules and requirements.
    • Will the revenue changes impact bond/debt covenants (negatively)?
    • How will therapy provision be monitored, especially if therapy is provided via a contractor?  CMS has warned that drastic changes in minutes provided and/or treatment levels (from almost exclusively 1 to 1 to group and concurrent) will lead to targeted audits and potential penalties
    • Revenue changes not adequately predicted to the Board
    • Patient satisfaction changes (negative).  PDPM places a premium on efficiency of stay, especially given the variable payment dynamic.  Will care be complete and patients satisfied or will corners be cut adversely impacting satisfaction?
    • Compliance changes (adverse) or performance changes adverse due to PDPM. Has the organization’s performance metrics such as rehospitalizations, falls, infections rates, etc. changed? Any adverse survey changes or serious citations occurred? The Board must be actively engaged in QAPI and should be monitoring quality of care data
    • Budgets and investments met/made to assure smooth and supportive transition to PDPM
  5. PDPM: Other? The Board should require periodic updates across an extended period of time on how the transition to PDPM has impacted the organization, positively and negatively.  Similarly, as with all other major industry changes, PDPM should impact strategic plans and the same, should adjust for the impact PDPM will have.

Given that PDPM will implement October 1, organizations that haven’t at least begun Step 1 above are behind.  Step 2 should occur ASAP, especially since many organizations will likely see some negative revenue impact, if they have a disproportionate Medicare book of therapy of ultra-high RUGs and longer lengths of stay.  Any organization with a therapy contract (not employed, in-house) will need to get into discussions NOW regarding PDPM and their contract terms.  PDPM changes are sweeping and shouldn’t be ignored and/or, under sold and misconstrued to the Board or governing body.  The risks are too great and the organizational peril, too high.

 

January 31, 2019 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

PDPM and Therapy Contracts Webinar

On February 6 at 1:00 PM eastern, my rehab specialty partner Dean Freeland, PT and  I will be conducting a webinar on PDPM and Therapy.  This live (and recorded) event will cover the new SNF Medicare fee-for-service reimbursement program (PDPM) going into effect on October 1 of this year.  As the new system substantially changes how SNFs are paid under Medicare, we will review preparation strategies and contract strategies for SNFs that use rehabilitative therapy contractors for PT, OT, and Speech.  Even if your SNF is using in-house/employed therapists, this webinar is worthwhile as we will cover the mechanics of payment categories and the nuances of PDPM that are critical to capturing the proper levels of reimbursement.

To participate in this event/program, click on the link below for registration details.  Hope you all can attend!

http://hcmarketplace.com/pdpm-therapy-contracts

 

January 28, 2019 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Upcoming Webinar: Reducing Hospitalizations and SNF Reimbursement Implications

I am conducting a webinar on Thursday, November 8 regarding the strategies SNFs can and should employ to reduce unnecessary hospital transfers/hospitalizations (E.R. visits and inpatient admissions).  Value-based purchasing has just taken hold in the SNF realm with facilities about to experience their first outcome October 1, 2018 (incentive or reduction).  I’ll cover the policy implications but moreover, review upcoming reimbursement issues beyond just VBP, delving into the care transition (hospitalization) implications that are woven in PDPM.  For example, with PDPM instilling a critical focus on length of stay via imbedded payment reductions after day 20, facilities will naturally look to shorten lengths of stay perhaps at the peril of VBP (Value-Based Purchasing) implications.

During the hour-long session, I’ll address;

  • Reimbursement and policy related implications associated with unnecessary care transitions/hospitalizations under VBP but also, tangential to QRP, PDPM, Five Star QMs, survey and relative to the IMPACT Act.
  • Proven strategies with tools to identify transition risk, monitor performance and benchmark an SNF against its peers.
  • How to leverage good performance in a competitive market and to gain market share in a bundled payment, Medicare Advantage, pay-for-performance environment.

More information and registration information is available at this link.

http://hcmarketplace.com/reducing-readmissions

 

September 13, 2018 Posted by | Policy and Politics - Federal, Skilled Nursing | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

SNF Final Rule 2019: Key Points and Provisions

Beginning yesterday, I’ve been following the news regarding CMS’ annual issuance of Final PPS rules for providers.  Of greatest interest is the SNF Final Rule as it includes a completely new payment system, departing from the RUGS IV, therapy-centric system currently in-place.  I’ve read through the Final Rule (all 424 mind-numbing pages) and summarized what SNFs need to know right now. I will undoubtedly expand upon the PDPM model as more is known and I’ve modeled claims via provider experience data.

RATE: The Final Rule includes a 2.4% increase to SNFs via adjustments to the RUGS IV categories/CMIs.  NOTE:  Providers that have not met their QRP (Quality Reporting) requirements/data submissions will receive a .04% increase – net of the 2% penalty.

SNF QRP: There were no changes made to the SNF QRPs in this rule.  The Claims-Based Measures of, 1) Community/Post-Acute discharge; 2) Preventable re-hospitalizations (30 days post discharge), and; 3) Spending per Medicare beneficiary (SNF) remain.  The Assessment-Based Measures of , 1) Falls with injury; 2) New or worsening pressure injuries post-admission, and; 3) Percent of patients with functional admission and discharge assessments and care plans.  CMS did indicate that it will adopt a “burden” or return on investment test for adoption or removal of future measures.

SNF VBP: The impact of Value-Based Purchasing begins Oct. 1, 2018. This incorporates an incentive payment or penalty reduction for the lone applicable quality measure: 30 day re-hospitalization rates post SNF discharge.  The Final Rule includes notably, an extraordinary circumstances exception policy plus discussion on future baseline periods for measurement, scoring changes, etc.

PDPM: This new payment system (Patient Driven Payment Model) is set to go into effect on October 1, 2019 (FY 2020). It will replace the RUGS IV system.  It is case-mix driven, utilizing the MDS assessment tool to categorize resident care needs via five case-mix categories: Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Nursing, and Non-Therapy Ancillary requirements.  The base non-clinical case-mix category remains which captures the room and board and capital costs for SNFs (technical stuff here so no need for detail). As part of PDPM, only three assessments (MDS) are needed/required. The first is correlated to admission, the second to discharge and the third is related to change in condition/change in need.  Payment, regardless of service utilization, is assessment driven via each case-mix category.  Also gone from this system is any intensity measure of therapy services (no minute requirements or frequency). Added to the therapy requirements is a provision that as much as 25% (aggregate) of therapy treatment time can be group or concurrent.  Based on data provided, the unadjusted Federal Urban PDPM rate (10/1/2019) would be $410.85 (before labor/wage adjustments). The Unadjusted Rural PDPM rate would be $425.37.

As in the Proposed Rule, PDPM incorporates a variable rate concept.  The Final Rule maintained this concept unaltered.  After day 20, rates begin to decline at a pace equal to 2% every 7 days, starting at day 21.  The decline correlates to reductions in PT and OT rates (.03 per day) and a reduction in NTA (Non-Therapy Ancillary).  More below on Non-Therapy Ancillary inclusions.

Under PDPM, residents are classified/coded via ICD 10 into one (only one) of ten clinical categories corresponding to the primary reason for the inpatient stay. CMS intends to map ICD-10 codes into the clinical categories for providers.

  1. Major Joint Replacement or Spinal Surgery
  2. Cancer
  3. Non-Surgical Orthopedic/Musculoskeletal
  4. Pulmonary
  5. Orthopedic (that doesn’t fall into #1)
  6. Cardiovascular and Coagulations
  7. Acute Infections
  8. Acute Neurologic
  9. Medical Management
  10. Non-Orthopedic Surgery

To accommodate higher-cost, sicker patients in the SNF setting, PDPM implements a Non-Therapy Ancillary case-mix. The NTA categories are below.  Other than the first category of HIV/AIDS, each NTA is picked-up from a corresponding MDS item. Sorry for the length but I think the list is informative for providers.

HIV/AIDS 

Parenteral IV Feeding: Level High

Special Treatments/Programs: Intravenous Medication Post-admit

Special Treatments/Programs: Ventilator or Respirator Post-admit

Parenteral IV feeding: Level Low

Lung Transplant Status

Special Treatments/Programs: Transfusion Post-admit

Major Organ Transplant Status, Except Lung

Active Diagnoses: Multiple Sclerosis Code

Opportunistic Infections

Active Diagnoses: Asthma COPD Chronic Lung Disease Code

Bone/Joint/Muscle Infections/Necrosis – Except Aseptic Necrosis of Bone

Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

Wound Infection

Active Diagnoses: Diabetes Mellitus (DM)

Endocarditis

Immune Disorders

End-Stage Liver Disease

Other Foot Skin Problems: Diabetic Foot Ulcer

Narcolepsy and Cataplexy

Cystic Fibrosis

Special Treatments/Programs: Tracheostomy Care Post-admit

Active Diagnoses: Multi-Drug Resistant Organism (MDRO)

Special Treatments/Programs: Isolation Post-admit

Specified Hereditary Metabolic/Immune Disorders

Morbid Obesity

Special Treatments/Programs: Radiation Post-admit

Highest Stage of Unhealed Pressure Ulcer – Stage 4

Psoriatic Arthropathy and Systemic Sclerosis

Chronic Pancreatitis

Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy and Vitreous Hemorrhage

Other Foot Skin Problems: Foot Infection Code, Other Open Lesion on Foot

Complications of Specified Implanted Device or Graft

Bladder and Bowel Appliances: Intermittent Catheterization

Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Aseptic Necrosis of Bone

Special Treatments/Programs: Suctioning Post-admit

Cardio-Respiratory Failure and Shock

Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Myelofibrosis

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Other Connective Tissue Disorders, and Inflammatory Spondylopathies

Diabetic Retinopathy – Except Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy and Vitreous Hemorrhage

Nutritional Approaches While a Resident: Feeding Tube

Severe Skin Burn or Condition

Intractable Epilepsy

Active Diagnoses: Malnutrition

Disorders of Immunity – Except : RxCC97: Immune Disorders

Cirrhosis of Liver 

Bladder and Bowel Appliances: Ostomy

Respiratory Arrest

Pulmonary Fibrosis and Other Chronic Lung Disorders

Summary: Ten clinical categories essentially begin the coding process (reason for admit).  From this point, each case-mix category is developed (PT, OT, SLP, Nursing and NTA). This is done via the admission MDS.  The rate is constant for days 1-20 of the stay.  Beginning on day 21, the rate reduces equal to 2% every additional 7 days.  A change of condition MDS can occur, altering the rate variability (reduction) by change in patient need.  One more assessment (MDS) is completed to recap the stay at discharge and capture QRP data.  In the meantime, stay tuned for additional information and strategic tips on how to prepare for PDPM and what specifically, to know in interpreting the “best path/best-practices” at the facility level.

 

August 1, 2018 Posted by | Skilled Nursing | , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

SNF PPS Final Rule 2019

Yesterday I wrote a quick post regarding the news that CMS was about to issue the SNF Final Rule for Fiscal Year 2019.  Today, the text is available.  Official publication in the Federal Register is set for August 8th.  Readers may access the text here: SNF 2019 Final Rule

I will have analysis and more information available regarding the Final Rule implications for providers later today.  NOTE: Biggest implications center on the shift away from RUGS IV to PDPM (new payment model).  That shift/change occurs 10/1/19 unless otherwise delayed.  On this site, on the Reports and Other Documents page, there is a PDPM calculation worksheet for download.  You can also access it here via this link: PDPM Calculation for SNFs

The worksheet is a good tool/review to grasp the basic mechanics of PDPM and how rates are/will be derived.

August 1, 2018 Posted by | Skilled Nursing | , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

CMS Proposes New SNF Payment Model

Last Friday, CMS released the contents of its annual proposed rule updating the SNF PPS plus (as always), fine tuning certain related programmatic elements. Final Federal Register Publication is set for May 8.  (Anyone wishing the PDF version may download it from the Reports and Other Documents page on this site or access it here SNF Proposed Rule 4 2018 ).  The most watched information for providers is the proposed rate adjustment though lately, for the post-acute segments of health care, other elements pertaining to payment model changes have eclipsed rate “watching”.

Last year’s proposed rule for the SNF PPS contained the release of RCS-1.  After extensive commentary, CMS pulled back RCS-1, shelving it for some conceptual remake.  We now, as of Friday, know the remake – PDPM for short (Patient Driven Payment Model). As with all yearly releases similar, a comment period has begun, lasting until (if not otherwise extended) the last week of June (June 26).

PDPM as proposed, is designed to replace the current SNF payment methodology known as RUGs IV.  Unless date changes, etc. are made by CMS post commentary review, the effective date of the change (from RUGs to PDPM) is 10/1/19 (next October).   PDPM as an outgrowth of RCS-1 and received commentary, is a simplified payment model designed to be more holistic in patient assessment, capture more clinical complexity, eliminate or greatly reduce the therapy focus by eliminating the minute levels for categorization, and simplifying via reduction, the assessment process and schedule (reduced to three possible assessments/MDS tasks). Below is a summary of PDPM core attributes/features as proposed.  On this site in the Reports and Other Documents page is the PDPM Calculation Worksheet that provides additional details beyond the reference points below PDPM Calculation for SNFs.

  • PDPM uses five, case-mix adjusted components for classification and thus, payment: PT, OT, Speech, Non-Therapy Ancillary and Nursing.
  • For each of these components, there are separate groups which a resident may be assigned, based on MDS data.  For example, there are 16 PT groups, 16 OT groups, 12 Speech groups, 6 Non-Therapy Ancillary groups and 25 Nursing groups.
  • Each resident, by assessment, is classified into one of the group elements within the component categories. This means that every resident falls into a group within the five case-mix components of PT. OT, Speech, Non-Therapy Ancillary and Nursing.
  • Each separate case-mix component has its own case-mix adjusted indexes and corresponding per diem rates.
  • Three of the components, PT, OT and Non-Therapy Ancillary have variable per diem features that allow for changes in rates due to changing patient needs during the course of the stay.
  • The full per diem rate is calculated by adding the PT, OT, and Non-Therapy Ancillary rates (variable) to the non-adjusting or non-variable Nursing and Speech components.
  • Therapy utilization may include group and/or concurrent treatment sessions provided no more than 25% of the total therapy utilization (by minutes) is classified as group or concurrent.
  • PT, OT, and Speech classification by group within their respective components do not include any function of “time”.  The sole denominator of how much/little therapy a resident receives is the necessity determined by the assessment process and by the clinical judgment of the care team.  In this regard, the minimum and maximum levels are based on resident need not on a predetermined category (RUG level).
  • Diagnoses codes from the hospital on admission (via ICD-10) are important and accuracy on the initial MDS (admission) are imperative.
  • Functional measures for Therapy (PT, OT) are derived from Section GG vs. Section G as provided via RCS-1.
  • The Non-Therapy Ancillary component allows facilities to capture additional acuity elements and thus payment, for additional existing comorbidities (e.g., pressure ulcers, COPD, morbid obesity, etc. ) plus a modifier for Parenteral/IV feeding.
  • There are only three Medicare/payment assessments (MDS) required or predicated starting in October of 2019 – admission, change of condition/payment adjustment and discharge. NOTE: All other required MDS submissions for other purposes such as QRP, VBP, Quarterly, etc. remain unchanged.

For SNFs, the takeaways are pretty straight-forward. First, clinical complexity appears to be the focus of increased payment opportunity.  Second, therapies are going to change and fairly dramatic as utilization does not involved minutes and more is better, when clinically appropriate but less is always relevant (if that makes sense).  The paperwork via MDS submissions is definitely less but assessment performance in terms of accuracy and clinical judgment is increased.   MDS Coordinators, those that are exceptional clinicians and can educate and drive a team of clinicians, will be prized as never before.  RUG style categorization is over so the focus is not on maximizing certain types of care and thus payment but on being clinically savvy, delivering high quality and being efficient.  The latter is what I have been preaching now for years.  Those SNFs that have been trending in this direction, caring for clinically complex patients, not shunning the use and embrace of nursing RUGs, and being on the ball in terms of their assessments and QMs are likely to see some real benefits via the PDPM system.

More on this new payment model and strategies to move forward will be in upcoming posts.

May 1, 2018 Posted by | Policy and Politics - Federal, Skilled Nursing, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment